Glass Remembered …. World War 2 (WW2) Newsworthy Events

From the Huntly Express November 17 1939

IN AID OF FUNDS FOR SOLDIERS PARCELS

GRAND BASKET

WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE

Will be held

In Glass Parish Hall

On Friday 24th November

Tickets – Whist and Dance  2/6d.

Whist only 1/6d.

Dance only 1/-

Doors open 7.39 pm  Whist at 8 prompt.

Prizes will be given for best Decorated Basket.

DANCE TO FOLLOW

(Subject to permission being granted.)

Music by Keith Melody Makers

A Free Bus leaves Huntly Square at 9.30 pm

 

From the Huntly Express November 24 1939

GLASS

POPPY DAY COLLECTION

The sum of £6. 4s. 7d. has been remitted to the Earl Haig Fund as the result of Poppy Day Collection by the pupils of Glass Central School.  The collectors were – Annie Gilchrist, Winnie Robson, Nan Rust, Mary Thomson, Muriel Thomson, Margaret Bagrie, Jean Smith, Isobel Smith, Jean McPherson, Mary McIrvine, Sandy McBain, Donald Thom.

 

From the Huntly Express December 22 1939

GLASS M.R.C.

A GRAND ANNUAL DANCE

Will be held in the GLASS PUBLIC HALL

On Friday 29th December

9pm to 2 am

In Aid of the Local War Comforts Fund and the Red Cross Huntly Branch

RICE’S BAND

Spot Waltz etc.

Admission (Including Tea_

Ladies 1/6d.  Gents 2/6d.

A Free Bus will leave Huntly Square at 8.30 pm

Alex. Thomson, Jun., Secretary

 

From the Huntly Express December 29 1939

GLASS

RED CROSS COLLECTION

The sum collected in Glass district amounted to £7. 3s. 7d.  The collectors were Misses A. McBain, M. Donald, J. Thomson, M. Duncan, C.I. Whyte, J. Burgess, E. Horne, M. Simpson, I. Bagrie, M. McIrvine, J. McPherson, J. Smith, I. Smith and C.A. Hill.  The collection was organised by Mrs Watson, Schoolhouse.

 

5 January 1940

OOR LOONS

Oh, Scottish men frae ilka glen
Frae valley an’ frae mighty ben,
We’re sairly grieved an’ sad tae ken
Ye’re far ye are the day.

 A year syne wha wid ever thocht
Our Premier’s plans wid come tae nocht
An’ ye’d be far yer father’s focht
In the he’rt o’ the fray.

Oh’ nineteen-forty just begun
Ye winna wait, yer course ye’ll run
An’ many a bonnie mother’s son
Will join the ranks in you.

 I ken they winna lat us doon
Scottish man an’ Scottish loon,
But yet will wear the victor’s croon,
Although they are but few.

For Scottish man were ever brave
Their wee bit bonnie land tae save,
An’ nane wid fill a coward’s grave
No matter what it meant.

I see you proudly marching by
With merry laugh an’ courage high,
Stern resolution in each eye,
As on your way ye went.

 I’m proud tae see the whole Empire
Sae firmly knit in trouble dire;
They’ll fight, I know, an’ never tire,
But gladly give their help.

In air, in sea, an’ on the land
They’ll hae tae dance at your command.
The order noo is in your hand;
Sae is the tawse tae skelp.

We’re daen fat we can at game
Oor thochts are far we canna name
Fond thochts, sad thochts, a’ the same,
Our trust in you is high.

United we will carry on
Until we see the victory won
An’ end tae the voracious Hun
An’ a’ the trouble by.

by

G.R.S. Rough, Rhynie

 

From the Huntly Express January 5 1940

GLASS

CHRISTMAS TREAT

The pupils of the Central School and the evacuee children held their Christmas treat on closing day.  Over a hundred children spent an enjoyable afternoon in games and dancing.  The highlight of the afternoon was the appearance of Santa Claus who dismantled a beautiful and heavily-laden Christmas tree.  The afternoon passed all too quickly and at the close the lusty cheers of the children made no mistake in showing their appreciation.

From the Huntly Express January 12 1940

MINISTRY OF FOOD

REASONS FOR RATIONING

War has meant the re-planning of our food supplies.  Half our meat and most of our bacon, butter and sugar come from overseas.  Here are four reasons for rationing:-

 1) RATIONING PREVENTS WASTE OF FOOD.  We must not ask our sailors to bring us unnecessary food cargoes at the risk of their lives.

2) RATIONING INCREASES OUR WAR EFFORT.  Our shipping carries food and armaments in their raw and finished state and other essential raw materials for home consumption and the export trade.  To reduce our purchases of food abroad is to release ships for bringing us other imports.  So we shall strengthen our war effort.

3) RATIONING DIVIDES SUPPLIES EQUALLY.  There will be ample supplies for our 44 ½ million people, but we must divide them fairly, everyone being treated alike.  No one must be left out.

4) RATIONING PREVENTS UNCERTAINTY.  Your Ration Book assures you of your fair share.  Rationing means that there will be no uncertainty – and no queues.

 YOUR RATION BOOK IS YOUR PASSPORT TO EASY PURCHASING OF BACON & HAM, BUTTER AND SUGAR

 

From the Huntly Express February 23 1940

IN AID OF RED CROSS AND LOCAL SOLDIERS’ COMFORTS FUND

LEAP YEAR DANCE

In GLASS PUBLIC HALL

On Friday 1st March at eight pm

Admission: Gents 2/6d.: Ladies 1/6d: (tea included)

CURLY MCKAY’S BAND
Duncan and P. Thomson Joint Secretaries

 

From the Huntly Express  March 1 1940

GLASS SOCIAL EVENING

A large company of members and friends enjoyed the social evening held by the W.R.I.   At a whist drive Mr A. Burgess, Auchinhandoch, was timekeeper.  Prize-winners were: – Ladies 1 Miss Wood, Beldorney Schoolhouse: 2 Mrs Gardyne, Beldorney Kennels:  Gentlemen 1 Mr J. Young, South Manse; 2 Mr J. Strathdee, Cairnarget;  Consolation – Mr W. McBain, jun., Beldorney.  Prizes were presented by Mrs Ingleby, Invermarkie Lodge.  A sketch “Saut Beef” was well acted by Miss Horn, Westerpark and Messrs Forbes, Horn and Watt.  Mrs McLean, Police Station, gave two songs, accompanied by Miss Watson, Schoolhouse and there were recitations by Mrs Milne, Invermarkie Kennels and Messrs Forbes and Horn; mouth-organ solos by Mr J. Macpherson, Braehead and piano-accordion selections by Miss P. Thomson, Haugh, accompanied by Miss Thomson.  A short dance followed to music by Red Rice’s Band, with Mr R. Thomson, Haugh M.C.  Mrs Mackie, Edinglassie Kennels thanked Mrs Ingleby for presenting the prizes and also thanked all who had assisted with the programme.

From the Huntly Express March 8 1940

IN AID OF GLASS AND CABRACH NURSING ASSOCIATION

CABRACH AMATEUR DRAMATIC CLUB

Will present

“THE GENTLEMAN FRAE GLESCA”

“MASONS’ WORDS”

And “MOSES AND THE MADMAN”

(Produced by Mr F. Hendry)

IN GLASS PARISH HALL

On Friday 15th MARCH

Admission 2/4d. and 1/3d. Children 6d.

Doors open 7.30; Commence 8 pm

DANCE TO FOLLOW – Admission 1s.

Rod Rice’s Band

From the Huntly Express March 22 1940

GLASS W.R.I.

A CAKE AND CANDY SALE

ALSO BULB SHOW

Will be held in

GLASS PARISH HALL

On Friday 29th March

To be Opened at Five pm

A DANCE will be held after Sale

Commencing 8pm  Ladies 1/6d. Gents 2/6d.

Rod Rice’s Band

 

From the Huntly Express May 3 1940

ON THE KITCHEN FRONT

3 GOOD HOUSEKEEPING RULES

In War everyone has a part to play – not least the Housewife.  So much of our food comes from overseas, that care and skill in its use is now a national duty.  Here are three ways in which all can help:-

1 AVOID WASTE

No doubt you see to it that very little food is wasted in your kitchen, but however little, multiply it by 12 million and it becomes a lot.  If some waste could be prevented in each kitchen it would enormously relieve the task of our shipping.  So show your appreciation of the courage and devotion of our seamen by being doubly careful.

2 GET THE BEST OUT OF FOOD

A great deal of useful knowledge is now available on the choice and preparation of food.  To spread this new information special demonstrations of wartime cooking and catering are being given up and down the country.  Don’t miss the demonstrations in your district.  You will learn a lot of interesting facts which will answer many of your housekeeping and cooking problems.  Enquire at your local Food Office or Education Authority.

3 VARY YOUR MEALS

It is not the amount of food that matters.  We must eat the right food.

We should have something from each of the four food groups every day.  They are:-

1 BODY BUILDING FOODS; Milk, cheese, eggs, meat, fish

2 ENERGY FOODS; Bacon and ham, bread, butter or margarine, cheese, dried fruit, dripping or suet or lard, honey, oatmeal, potatoes, rice or sago, sugar

3 PROTECTIVE FOODS Group 1:  Milk, butter or margarine, cheese, eggs, liver, herrings or salmon (tinned or fresh)

4 PROTECTIVE FOODS Group 2: Potatoes, carrots, fruit (fresh or canned but not dried), green vegetables or salads, tomatoes, wholemeal bread

ISSUED BY THE MINISTRY OF FOOD

 

From the Huntly Express May 3 1940

HUNTLY DISTRICT COUNCIL

PROPOSED EXTENSION OF WALLAKIRK CHURCHYARD

GLASS CHURCHYARDS

Following the question of the provision of burial ground for strangers in the various parishes and the subject of war graves, which was contained in a communication from the County Clerk, Mr Mitchell stated that in a recent letter from the local clerk at Glass, he had been informed that both the graveyards at Glass were practically full.  The County Clerk had been informed of the matter and had expressed the opinion that the matter should be dealt with immediately and that a small committee should be appointed to confer with the County Engineer’s  staff.  Messrs A. Simpson and J. Duff, Boghead, were appointed along with the Chairman to this committee.

In connection with the proposed extension of the graveyard, the Clerk suggested if it was to be carried out at Wallakirk, that the piece of ground adjoining the churchyard already walled, might be added if the sub-soil was found to be suitable.  He had heard it said that there was  rock there.

Mr James Duff said the feeling in the district was in favour of the proposed extension at Wallakirk rather than at the Church.

From the Huntly Express 17 May 1940

NEW DEFENCE CORPS

ENORMOUS RESPONSE TO CALL

The new Local Defence Corps announced by Mr Eden, War Minister, as a precaution against the possibility of Nazi parachute troops and saboteurs landing in the country, will wear light khaki denim overalls, similar to those worn by mechanised troops and field service of forage caps.

Officers will be chosen locally in all cases to ensure that the Corps is led by men with an intimate knowledge of the areas for which they are responsible.  There will be a free issue of petrol to organisers and leaders with big areas to cover by road.

Although the service is purely voluntary and unpaid, the response throughout the country has been enormous.  Offers have already been received from men who have retired from business early in life and may be able to give full-time to the work.

Police Stations have been asked to take volunteers’ names, nationality, addresses and particulars of any military or O.T.C. service.  Preference will be given to men with experience in handling firearms and some will be allowed to use their own guns and revolvers.

They will be enrolled for the duration of the war, be at the disposal of the Home Command of the Army and undertake to turn out at any time to defend towns and villages.

Although there are now many women in miniature rifle clubs, there is no intention at the present time to invite women to join the new Corps, it is stated.

The British Legion, is co-operating in the formation of the Corps, whose hours of spare time duty will vary according to the extent of roads, moors, coastline and other possible landing grounds for parachute troops which have to be patrolled.

The response to the appeal in Huntly was good, amongst the volunteers being men who served in the last war, in addition to quite a number of younger men.  Between forty and fifty have already offered their services.

From the Huntly Express JULY 1940

GLASS PUBLIC HALL

A GRAND DANCE

Will be held in the above on Friday 12 July in aid of War Comforts

Prizes for  Spot Waltz etc.

Findlay’s Band will be in attendance

Tea served

Gents 2/6d Ladies 1/6d  Doors open 8.30 pm

  1. Murray & J. Main

Joint Secs.

 

From the Huntly Express JULY 1940

GLASS

GARDEN PARTY

Glass W.R.I. members with others who had knotted for the soldiers, were entertained at Invermarkie Lodge at a garden party.  After seeing through the house and gardens, various games were entered into the winners being:-  1 Mrs Kerr, Cairnborrow: 2 Miss Black, Braiton: 3 Miss M. McBain, Invermarkie Lodge.

Mrs D. McLean, Police Station, with a choir which she had trained, gave several songs.  The soloists were Miss Janet Burgess and Miss Mary McPherson, Mrs Watson, Schoolhouse and Mrs McLean accompanying.  Votes of thanks were given to Mrs Ingleby by Mrs Duncan for all kindness to the visitors that afternoon.  Mrs Ingleby proposed a vote of thanks to Mrs McLean for the musical items her choir had given.

 

JULY 1940

RED CROSS NOTES

From Invermarkie and Blairmore Farm Dance Committee comes the handsome sum of £7 for which the Red Cross is exceedingly grateful.

 

AUGUST 1940

GLASS

WARTIME COOKERY

Besides giving a demonstration of fruit bottling, Miss Gordon, Invermarkie Lodge, at the W.R.I.:- Mrs Ingleby, Invermarkie Lodge, presiding – showed the members several very good dishes of wartime cookery, and gave recipes for same.  Afterwards the dishes were sold for the funds.  Mrs Pinsent, Edinglassie Lodge, gave a talk on war work for sailors and Mrs Ingleby gave an account of the work of the local work party.  A competition by Mrs McBain, Beldorney, on “Rural Institutes in Aberdeenshire”, resulted – 1 Miss Gauld, Parkhaugh: 2 Mrs Duncan, Westerpark.  Mrs Pinsent proposed the vote of thanks to Miss Gordon.

2nd August 1940

HOME GUARD

PART OF THE BRITISH ARMY

The German wireless has recently been claiming that the Home Guard (L.D.V.s) were not a military formation within the terms of the Hague Conventions and therefore not entitled to the privileges due to the armed forces of the belligerent.

The legal position as defined by the Crown lawyers is that the Home Guard is in fact an integral part of the British Army.   In Germany there is an organisation known as the Labour Service through which all young men have to pass.  This is ostensibly a civilian organisation, but in fact its members are called upon to qualify in miniature rifle-shooting.  When the required number of practices have been carried out the man goes on to a standard rifle.  This is followed by machine-gun practice, and finally instruction is given in the throwing of hand-grenades.

From the Huntly Express 16 August 1940

GLASS SHOW AND SALE OF CATTLE

The Elgin Market Green Auction Company at their annual show of store cattle at Glass Mart, had a very good entry of all classes of store cattle on offer.  Over eighty head presented for sale were mostly all sold as they passed through the ring.  Messrs James Clark, Croftgibb, Keith and James Davidson, Damside, Keith were the judges.  The championship again went to Mr James Duff, Netherton, the reserve being awarded to Mr Gauld, Dumeath.  Other awards – Best pair –1 Duff, Netherton: 2 Stewart, Bowmakelloch.  Best single – 1 Duff: 2 Gauld.  At the sale the champion made £32,15s to Mr Lawson, Alford and the reserve made £28.5s. to Mr F. Ralph, Elgin.  Other prices were – Netherton £25.5s.: Belnaboth £26: Dumeath £25.5s: Auldyne £22.10s.: Torry £22. Etc.

 

August 23 1940

TO HOME GUARDS

Don’t forget that French, Polish and Czech airmen are flying with the Royal Air Force.  A solitary parachutist may be one of these and unable to speak English.  If you see five, or less, they may be our own men.

SEPTEMBER 1940

PRISONER OF WAR

Pte. John Ogilvie, husband of Mrs Ogilvie, Glenmoriston, Glass   He was in the Regular Army.

From the Huntly Express  September 20 1940

GLASS

COUNTRY DANCING

At the W.R.I. Mrs Ingleby presiding – Miss McRae, Huntly, gave a demonstration on wool embroidery and also showed some lovely specimens of her work.  Mrs Ingleby thanked Miss McRae for her very interesting demonstration.  Miss McRae then gave a competition, which was won by Mrs McPherson, Braehead Cottage.  Miss Bateson’s pupils entertained the members to an exhibition of country dancing, which was very much enjoyed.  Mrs Pinsent gave a competition on bandaging, the winners being:-  1 -Mrs Fraser and Mrs McPherson, 2 – Miss M. McPherson and Mrs McBain, 3 – Mrs Watson and Mrs Hill.  Mrs Pinsent was hostess, assisted by Mrs Anderson, Miss Gauld, Mrs Paterson and Mrs Mackie.

 

OCTOBER 1940

GLASS

HOME NURSING

At the W.R.I. on Friday night – Mrs Ingleby, Invermarkie Lodge presiding – Mrs  Garson, Huntly, gave the first of a course of four lectures on “Home Nursing”, which was very much appreciated.  Mrs Ingleby spoke on the war savings scheme and a group was formed with Mrs McBain, Beldorney as secretary and treasurer.  Mrs Ingleby gave an account on the work party; £60 had been raised by various entertainments, which was considered very satisfactory.  Wool was given out as usual, and it was agreed to send £2 per month for the two local men who are prisoners of war.  For oatcakes the winners were;- 1 Mrs Main, Markethill: 2 Miss Milne, Invermarkie Lodge: 3 Mrs Fraser, Beldorney.   Mrs Campbell and Mrs McLean were judges.  Mrs McLean sang two songs, members joining in the chorus.  Mrs Anderson, Mrs Paterson and Miss McMillan were hostesses.  Votes of thanks were by Mrs Ingleby.

 

PRISONERS OF WAR

AN APPEAL

There are at least 2,000 Officers and Men from the North-East of Scotland PRISONERS OF WAR in the hands of the enemy.  The BRITISH RED CROSS SOCIETY is the only authorised channel through which parcels of food, etc. may be sent to these men, and on behalf of the Scottish Branch of this Society, an appeal under the convenership of Major M.V. Hay of Seton, is being made for the counties of Aberdeen, Banff, Kincardine, Orkney and Shetland for funds for this purpose.

To collect money for this fund a local organisation is being set up in the Huntly area which includes the burgh of Huntly, the parishes of Cairnie, Drumblade, Forgue, Gartly and Glass and the districts of Kinnoir and Longhill.  This local organisation will encourage the formation of groups of people willing to combine to “adopt” one of more prisoners.

Meanwhile, subscriptions are urgently required; those should be sent to the treasurer for the Huntly area, Mr George F. Dickson, 1 Old Road, Huntly, who will transmit local subscriptions to Major M.V. Hay, Convener of the Prisoners of War Appeal, Amicable House, Aberdeen.

Ronald S. Thomson

Sub-Controller

George F. Dickson

Secretary and Treasurer, Huntly Area, North-East of Scotland Prisoners of War Appeal.

 

From the Huntly Express 22 November 1940

GLASS POPPY DAY

The Earl Haig Fund Poppy Day collection amounted to £7.14s.8d. an increase on last year’s collection.  It was organised by Mr A. Watson, Schoolhouse.  The collectors were Misses F. Fraser, A. Gilchrist, W. McWILLIAM, R. Clark, I. Bagrie, M. Rust, A. Robertson, M. Smith, B. Black, M. McIrvine, J. McPherson, M. Bagrie, H. Clark and A. McBain.

DECEMBER 1940

GLASS

SOCIAL

Visitors and Home Guards were guests at the W.R.I. and the company was welcomed by Mrs Ingleby.  Mr Hoops, Huntly gave hints on community singing, and the company joined in the various songs.  In a tune-spotting competition the winners were Mrs Barclay, Miss Proctor, Mrs Watson, Miss M. Duncan, Miss McKay, Mr G. Simpson and Mr Baxter.  Solos were sung by Miss Hoops and Messrs Milne and Smith, all of whom had to respond to encores.  A hearty vote of thanks was accorded Mr Hoops.  A dance followed to music by Mrs Watson, Schoolhouse (who also accompanied the singers), and Mr A. Duncan, Edinglassie.  Mrs Ingleby proposed the votes of thanks and Mr Bush and Mr W. McIrvine replied and thanked the W.R.I.

JANUARY 1941

LETTER FROM IRAQ

GLASS LADS INTERESTING EXPERIENCE

Dancing an eightsome reel and eating haggis in Baghdad, is not another fanciful tale of the mystic East, but was the unusual experience of LEADING AIRCRAFTSMAN AITKEN, son of Mr and Mrs Aitken, Bodylair, Glass, who is presently stationed with the R.A.F. in Iraq.  His mother has kindly sent us her son’s letter with the details which we feel sure will be of general interest to our readers.

L./A.C. AITKEN describes how he and some fifty other airmen from his station received an invitation from the Baghdad Caledonian Society to attend a St Andrew’s Night Dinner held in the Alwiyah Club, Baghdad on Saturday 30th November (1940)  They were all conducted into Baghdad in the afternoon in time for the big dinner and dance in the evening.

At the dinner, said L./A.C. AITKEN, the haggis was piped in the real approved manner, and then, of course, after everybody had enough to eat, they had to drink all the different toasts.  The latter, remarks the writer, was a bit of a strain.  After dinner came the dancing and it was very much enjoyed by everybody there.  There were several eightsome reels, strip the willows, Highland schottisches etc. the  writer says he does not think he ever enjoyed a dance so much in his life.  It was the first time he had been at a dance since he came to Iraq, and he expected it would be the last he would get there.

After breakfast and lunch on Sunday, they were all conveyed back to their station in the afternoon after what, judging by L./A.C. Aitken’s letter, must have been – for a Scotsman at anyrate – a grand outing.

FEBRUARY 21 1941

Tonight a grand dance is being held in Glass Public Hall in aid of the Prisoners of War Fund.  Finlay’s band will be in attendance and tea will be served during the evening.  Added attraction will be provided by waltz and fox-trot competitions.  In charge of the arrangements are Misses M. Duncan and P. Thomson.

Huntly Express February 21 1941

RAIDS IN THE NORTH-EAST

WIDESPREAD ATTACKS BY SINGLE ENEMY MACHINES

During the past week enemy raiders flying singly have paid several visits to the North-East of Scotland and some damage and casualties have been reported from certain areas.

At noon on Friday, an enemy raider, flying very fast and so low that the swastika was clearly seen, dropped three bombs at a fishing town on the north-east coast.  A few windows in a Masonic temple and in business premises were broken by blast, but no other damage was reported.  The plane then proceeded to machine-gun a road on which at the time, were a passenger bus and a number of pedestrians but no one was hit.  The bomber disappeared afterwards at high speed.

TRAIN MACHINE-GUNNED

A Nazi raider attacked a passenger train in the north-east with machine-gun fire on Saturday.  The plane crossed over the train about six times with machine-gun firing, descending to sixty or a hundred feet.  No one was injured  and the only damage was to three windows.   There was a second raid to the north-east of Scotland in the evening.   Ten bombs were dropped and were scattered over several parishes.  Damage was confined to farm buildings and consisted for the most part of windows smashed, slates ripped off roofs and doors broken.

TWO NORTH-EAST TOWNS BOMBED

Bombs were dropped on two towns in the north-east of Scotland on Monday by single raiders, but only slight damage was done.   One man was slightly injured.   In one of the attacks the driver of a lorry and a little girl who was with him, escaped unhurt when a bomb burst a few yards from the vehicle.  It was one of four dropped by a Nazi in the first raid the town has had.   One of the bombs fell in the sea and another on a hill.  In the second case a four-engine bomber flew very low over the town and seemed to skim the tops of the houses.   Three bombs were dropped, but there were no casualties and little damage was done.

WIDESPREAD ATTACKS

A sixteen year old girl was killed while peeling potatoes when a lone enemy raider dropped bombs on a north-east of Scotland town on Wednesday afternoon.  Her father and a neighbour were also killed.  The neighbour was returning to her house after hanging out clothes to dry when she met her death.  Seven others in adjacent houses were seriously injured.  The plane also machine-gunned a school, a goods train and a bus.  It was flying low, but no-one was injured by the machine-gun fire.  A number of dwelling were badly damaged.

In another raid on a coastal town in the north-east of Scotland, also in the forenoon, a plane dropped two high explosive bombs and machine-gunned streets.  Several people were slightly injured.  The machine circled the town before dropping its bombs.  Blast broke many windows but houses withstood the  shock.  Another bomb exploded behind an unoccupied yard and wrecked some buildings.

A Nazi raider made three low flying attacks with incendiary bombs and machine-gun fire on a town in the north-east on Wednesday night and although fires broke out, they were quickly extinguished.  Anti-aircraft guns opened fire on the raider.  An enemy plane circled over a Scottish coast town the same evening.  No damage is reported.  A passenger train was machine-gunned but there is no report of any casualties.

From the Huntly Express April 25 1941

In Aid of Prisoners of War Fund

GRAND DANCE

Will be held in Public Hall, Glass

By Blairmore Boys

On Friday 2nd May 1941

Commencing 8.30 pm

Excellent Band in attendance

Tea will be served

Spot Waltz and other Prizes

Gents 2/6d:  Ladies 1/6d: H.M. Forces 1/6d

L/Cpl. A. Smith, Secretary

 

April 25 1941

PRISONERS OF WAR APPEAL

Per Mrs Ingleby, Glass:-

Mrs Gauld, Blackbog, Glass £1.0.0.

Mrs Fraser, Lhanbryde £1.0.0.

Messrs J. Robson and J. Summers proceeds of Dance £8.0.0.

Huntly Express 25 April 1941

RAIDS ON NORTH-EAST

There have been a few casualties, some fatal, in enemy air-raids in the Noth-east of Scotland during the  past week.  Yesterday week five women were killed when a bomb from a tap-and-run raider demolished a house in a town  on Thursday.  Six persons were seriously injured.  The raider came in low from the sea and machine gunned the streets and two high explosive bombs were dropped.  It was later announced that a five year old girl injured by the collapse of a house, died in hospital as the result of injuries.

Enemy aircraft which were over the North-east and East coast of Scotland on Friday night dropped two bombs near a village.  No casualties were reported.

Two towns were bombed and machine-gunned by enemy aircraft on Sunday afternoon.  In one of the towns Alistair Wilson aged 3 ½ years was killed and several civilians injured.  Children playing in the streets had narrow escapes from a shower of bullets as the raider flew low with machine-guns blazing.  The boy was killed by one of two bombs which fell on allotments.  His father, who was at work nearby, was seriously injured and later died in hospital.  Despite his injuries he made a valiant attempt to look for his boy and found him lying dying.  In another part of the town bullets rained down at the entrance of an air-raid shelter while children were running into the shelter by another entrance.

At the other town four people, including a woman and a child, were injured and taken to hospital.  Six other people were treated for injuries at first-air posts.  The casualties were caused by bombs which fell on the outskirts of a municipal housing scheme.

In a raid on Tuesday night, two high-explosive bombs were dropped in quick succession.  The only damage caused was to sheds, no one being hurt.

Enemy aircraft were reported over the North-east on Wednesday night.  Bombs were dropped in a country district, but no damage was reported.

 

From the Huntly Express May 2 1941

WE CAN BE MASTERS OF THE ENEMY’S TANKS

How our Forces may deal with a Weapon that Dreads the Dark

By a Military Correspondent

We have heard a great deal about the enemy’s tanks  since the war began.  Certainly they have proved a formidable weapon and they have been most skilfully used in Poland, France, Libya and Greece, the German mechanised force has shown itself an adversary that will take a lot of beating.

So little has been said about the methods by which the tank can be conquered that it is interesting to know of the many ways in which the British Army has been taught to battle with it.  In many areas in this country the HOME GUARD too, has been taught valuable lessons along the same lines.

Naturally, some of the ways in which the tank can be brought to a stop and then destroyed, cannot be revealed, but here is an outline of anti-tank measures which shows the truth of the maxim  that there is no weapon without its antidote.

USELESS AT NIGHT

It should always be remembered, of course, that the tank is a dead and useless thing in the darkness of night.  It must stop.  It dare not carry headlights.  Bright moonlight may help it to proceed on its course, but darkness is its dread.

The crew must emerge from the interior to rest or sleep or wait for the dawn.  The monster that only an hour ago was as deadly is now at the mercy of a few daring men.

Broadly speaking, there are two ways in which the tank can be tackled: first by the regular weapons of the Army, headed by the anti-tank gun, the Artillery’s special weapon for dealing with tanks, and secondly by guerrilla tactics which almost any troops, however much  or little artillery they possess, are capable of putting into action.

Our special anti-tank gun is a small and handy weapon, easily concealed.  The gunner must be well trained and a quick and accurate marksman.  Certain types of artillery such as field guns and R.A. guns, though not primarily for use against tanks, have always the secondary role of anti-tank defence.   The anti-tank rifle breaks tracks easily and penetrates a great deal of a tank’s armour plating, while a counter-attack by tank units is often the most effective of all defence.

Rifle fire and fire from light machine-guns and machine-guns, though they may not penetrate the armour of the tank, may be employed to force the crews to close down the flaps of their turrets, thus obscuring their observation.  Rifle fire may crack the observation glasses and destroy periscopes.  It may also break the tracks.

The use of anti-tank minefields, covered by fire to prevent their removal, can be an effective defence against a tank attack; a mine does not often destroy a tank, but it will stop it and make its destruction easier.

PAUSES FOR REST

So much for some of the regular methods of coping with the tank with weapons specially designed for its defeat.

Much can be done in other ways by soldiers, unequipped with such weapons, who remain undaunted and take every advantage of their opportunities.  Such soldiers will realise that though the tank is a machine it cannot be used perpetually without pauses for rest.

Not only when sleep is necessary does the tank have a clink in its armour.  Its trap doors cannot be closed for long stretches.  As soon as they are open a well-aimed bomb thrown through the opening is likely to destroy the tank or wreck the engine.

When once a tank has been halted, men in ambush can bring about its downfall with stick grenades, hand grenades, explosive bundles or incendiary bombs.  A “Molotoff cocktail”. Compounded of sulphite spirit, methylated spirit, petrol and tar is a useful recipe.  One bottle hurled on the ground in front of the tank, another against the nose and a third on the roof, ignited by various ingenious devices and you have a good chance of roasting or smoking the crew out of their fortress.

From the Huntly Express June 13 1941

TALK OF BALLADS

A talk of Ballads given by Mrs Cooper of Logie was a feature at Glass W.R.I. – Mrs Duncan, vice-president, in the chair.  At the business meeting the committee were all re-elected.  Competitions resulted – Best white eggs – 1 Mrs Main, Markethill: 2 Mrs Duncan, Westerpark: 3 Miss M. Milne, Invermarkie Lodge:  Brown eggs – 1 Mrs Cruickshank, South Manse: 2 Mrs Smith, Lynebain: 3 Miss . McBain, Invermarkie Lodge.  Mrs Couper’s competition – 1 Mrs Paterson, Edinglassie Cottage: 2 Mrs Barclay, Edinglassie Cottage.  The eggs were all sent to Huntly Cottage Hospital.  Hostesses were Mrs McBain, Mrs Fraser, Mrs Gardyne and Mrs Smith, Lynebain.

June 22 1941

GLASS COLLECTION

The following pupils attending Glass Public School collected the sum of £2 16s. for the Aberdeen City and County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children – Margaret Begrie, Betty Main, Muriel Watt, Margaret Henderson, David Paulley and Andrew Chrystal.

July 1 1941

GLASS PRESENTATION

Last Friday Miss C. I. Whyte, M.A. infant teacher at Glass Public School, was presented with a silver tea service and fruit bowl from the pupils, on the occasion of her forthcoming marriage.  The presentation was made by Anna Robertson, one of the senior pupils.

PARENTS DAY

A Parents Day was held in the School yesterday week when parents and friends had an opportunity of visiting the new school and seeing a display of work by the pupils.  This is the first Parents’ Day to be held in the school for many years and it is hoped to make it an annual feature.

August 1 1941

IN AID OF NORTH-EAST MEN’S COMFORTS FUND

A GRAND DANCE

Will be held in GLASS PARISH HALL

On FRIDAY 8th August

Commencing at nine pm

Excellent Band in attendance

Prizes for a Spot Waltz and Highland Schottische

Gents 2/6d: Ladies 1/6d: H.M. Forces 1/6d.

Refreshments sold.   Tea will be served

  1. Forbes and I. Simpson

Joint Secretaries

 

August 15 1941

 

GLASS

CATTLE SHOW

Elgin Market Green Auction Co. Ltd., had a good entry of store cattle at their special sale at Glass: a grand selling trade was got.  The judges – Mr John Tulloch, Uralla, Forres, and Mr Lawson, Baldlivan, Alford – gave the following awards – Best 4 cattle – 1 and 2 Robertson, Turfhillock.  Best Pair – 1 Duff, Netherton: 2 Duff, Boghead.  Best Single – 1 Duff, Netherton: 2 Gauld, Aldyne.  Champion – Duff, Netherton; Reserve – Robertson, Turfhillock.  The champion, a well finished blue-grey bullock, bred by Mr J. Duff, Netherton, made £31, to Mr Lawson, Alford.  Prices included – Netherton, £31, £39.15s.: £29.5s.: Lower Hilton £28.: Turfhillock £29.10s.: Nr. Dumeath £27.15s.; Glenbeg £27.10s.; Backside £27.5s.   Yearlings – Boghead £26.10s.; Edinglassie £23.  Highland heifers, £18.  Calves – Lower Hilton, £13.5s.  Fat cow – Greystonefold £19.

 

2 January 1942

WINTER TRAINING FOR THE HOME GUARD

EIGHT MAIN SUBJECTS FOR THE “SECOND YEAR” MAN

By a Military Correspondent

The fundamental principle in planning this winter’s training for the Home Guard, is that there should be different courses for trained and untrained members of the Home Guard.  The former should concentrate on the more mobile forms of defence as applied to their operational role, while the latter should receive individual training.

There are eight main subjects in which trained Hoe Guards will be schooled this winter.  First of all, they should be given whatever refresher training they need in the use of individual weapons, in fire control, the use of bombs, anti-gas training and map reading.  They should brush up their knowledge of the mechanism of weapons and practise shooting on miniature and open ranges.

SHIOOTING IN RESPIRATORS

Part of the anti-gas training consists in learning to shoot in respirators, for they may have to defend their land for the first time during a gas attack.  Their respirators must therefore not only fit perfectly but effectively, “anti-dimmed” to ensure against inaccurate firing at critical moments.  Trained and untrained Home Guards are taught to detect, prepare against and counteract air spray and all are given practice in decontamination.

The second subject in which the trained Home Guard must be fully informed is knowledge of the enemy, his armoured fighting vehicles, his aeroplane, uniforms, equipment and tactics.  Pamphlets, films and playlets are used to teach the necessary lessons.

Thirdly, the “second year men” in the Home Guard, will get experience in night operations, taking part in simple stalking exercises, in tests of various methods of mounting sentries and guards in the dark, and in night patrols and attacks on hypothetical tank concentrations.

Fourthly, there are lessons in “battle-craft” to be mastered – which means sharpening the instinct to make the best use of nature to help to outwit the enemy.  The study of the habits and protective colouring of wild animals teaches the inexperienced to ambush or stalk unobserved.

The fifth, sixth and seventh lessons deal with patrols, mobile patrols and the mechanism, laying and concealing of anti-tank mines.

The lesson which completes the course of winter training for the experienced Home Guard, consists of indoor tactical instructions with sand tables and cloth models as well as with films dealing with the operational role of the students themselves.

INTELLIGENCE WORK

The most fully trained Home Guards may, during the winter, specialise in signalling, intelligence work, operations with mobile patrols and the use of mortars and sub-artillery guns as well as in the first-aid, in liaison with the civil authorities.

During this winter, the untrained recruits to the Home Guard, takes an intensive course of training embracing seven subjects, Drill  comprising simple movements with and without rifles may take up to 10 percent of the time devoted to his training.  Weapon training with rifles, Browning , automatic rifle, medium machine-guns and sub-machine guns.

From the Huntly Express January 30 1942

DEATHS

ROBERTS-WEST – Killed in action on 26th November 1941, Lieutenant-Commander John Raymond Roberts-West, D.S.O.  Royal Navy, H.M.S. Barham. Only son of Lt.-Col. And Mrs C.R. Roberts-West and husband of Sarah, present address c/o J.A. Ingleby, Esq., Invermarkie Lodge, Glass, Huntly

Huntly Express 28 January 1942

HOME GUARD ARE TRAINED TO USE MANY WEAPONS

SOME UNITS HAVE BEGUN TO LEARN THE ANTI-TANK GUN

By a Military correspondent

Weapons with which the Home Guard are issued include – Pistols, service rifles, light and medium machine guns, automatic rifles, Thompson sub-machine guns, flame throwers, Northover projectors and other anti-tank weapons.

Every man in the Home Guard is trained to use some or all of these weapons, with the exception of the anti-tank weapons in which specialists are trained.  The Home Guard is moreover, trained to use not only the weapons with which they are issued, but also those they may pick up on the battle field after they have been abandoned by the enemy.

BEST RESULTS

Now for a word about the special training Home Guards receive in the use of their weapons.  In pistol shooting Home Guards are taught that the best results are obtained if the hand holding the weapon is brought up to the centre of the body, the position of the feet being immaterial.  They are taught also to fire that weapon from the hip from point-blank range to ten yards.  At greater distance there is not enough accuracy to warrant the expenditure of ammunition.

Home Guards are trained to fire the Thompson anti-machine gun “Tommy” for short, from the shoulder, with a rough alignment of sights; and also from the waist, aiming by sense of direction.  Six practices are necessary to become expert with the “Tommy” gun, a close-quarter weapon with which great accuracy can be obtained at ranges up to 50 yards.

The practices include firing rounds and bursts.  One consists of firing two bursts of five rounds in eight seconds at a target 20 yards distant.  With the Browning automatic rifle, Home Guards are trained on a 200 yards range in a lying position.  In the final practice the target is exposed for 40 seconds at a time and after ten single shots the last five rounds are fired in a burst.

The Home Guard are trained to throw bombs and grenades, the latter consisting of high explosive, smoke signal and incendiary grenades.   The high explosive grenade can be thrown a distance of about 30 yards.  Practice in throwing live high explosive grenades is carried out on grenade range under qualified instructors.  Men are taught that accuracy is of greater importance than distance when throwing grenades.

Once a satisfactory swing and a reasonable standard of accuracy has been obtained, practice with dummy grenades is carried out to teach the importance of throwing high from cover and in a lying posture, when the thrower, behind cover, aims his grenade at shell hole or circles marked on the ground.

NORTHOVER PROJECTORS

The Northover projector is a weapon used for hurling the heavier grenades or incendiary bottles against a tank attack; this, with the medium machine gun and other secret anti –tank weapons, is not an individual weapon but is used by teams.

Another very important weapon that may be used by the Home Guard in the future is the anti-aircraft gun and already there are units training for the role of A.A. gunners.

February 6 1942

GLASS

The devastating snowstorm which swept the North-east of Scotland on the anniversary of Burns’ birth, was a typical “blast of Januar’ win”, and with the Arctic conditions which prevailed, it may well go down in history as one of the fiercest snowstorms of the present century.  Throughout the counties of Aberdeen and Banff roads and railways were thrown out of commission, buildings and woodlands were damaged, telephonic  means of communication were cut off etc. as swiftly and as effectively as any invading enemy force could have done by the aid of high explosive.

Saturday January 24 was a treacherous day of bright sunlight and occasional showers of rain, and not a few people predicted that milder and fresher weather was at hand, but just before the shades of night fell a strong south-easterly gale sprang up and snow began to fall thick and fast.   Throughout the hours of darkness the fury of the gale intensified, so that long before daylight on Sunday 25th it had assumed the character of a hurricane and the continuous drifting ensured that neither man nor beast would stir far afield.

The storm had largely abated by Monday and attempts were made to have the roads cleared.  In this district a party of soldiers, with an Army snowplough, made fairly good progress in clearing the Huntly-Dufftown road, but a little past the farm of Boghead, a mechanical break-down caused them to abandon all further efforts.

Mails were disorganised, and it was not until the following Wednesday that any deliveries were made and even then under conditions which would ensure that no one would envy the rural postie his job.

Farmers and flockmasters had a fairly trying time, but in this respect we have seen more difficult times, because most farmers took advantage of the open spell in the two preceding months to procure a store of turnips and although fodder is in too many cases not the best of quality, there is in most farms a fairly abundant supply.

One of the chief characteristics of the storm was that the damage and inconvenience caused thereby was out of all proportions to the magnitude.  This was largely due to the terrific wind which accompanied the fall of snow.  Hills and high-lying fields which faced the gale were swept bare, while sunken roads and low sheltered ground secured a double quota.  In the Beldorney district the roads were, if anything, worse than they ever were last winter.  The dykes running along the roadside at Beldorney School were completely submerged, and the piles of snow from there up into the Cabrach could be better imagined than described.  At the farm of Wester Gouls, on the south bank of the Deveron, one of the largest wreaths was to be seen.  On one side of the farm steading the wreath reached from the sky-light far down the sloping ground below the building, and not a trace of the wall or lower part of the roof could be seen.

The procuring of provisions was an ever pressing problem, and to many residents of the more outlying areas they could only be borne by man power.  The traditionally provident hill-folk are more than ever aware of the difficulties caused by rationing which has made it impossible for them to follow their usual custom of laying in a store.

From the Huntly Express March 13 1942

GLASS

DEBATE

Following a debate – “Married Life v Single Life” – the local W.R.I. showed a majority for the former.  The respective leaders were Mrs Ingleby and Miss Hill supported by Mrs Main and Miss Thomson.  At a “Beetle” game prizes were won by Mrs Mackie and Mrs Barclay.  To close there was a “bring and buy” sale for the funds.  Mrs Watson, Schoolhouse, presided.  Mrs McBain, Mrs Fraser and Mrs Gardyne were hostesses.

 

From the Huntly Express March 13 1942

OUTBREAK OF FIRE AT GLASS

HALL PIANO DESTROYED

On Monday evening fire was reported to have broken out in Glass Parish Hall and what might have been a serious outbreak was alerted by the prompt and efficient action of the local constable and several willing helpers who prevented the flames, which threatened the whole building, from spreading.

There had been a meeting in the hall earlier in the evening, and a lamp which had been left near the piano was thought to have been responsible for the outbreak.  A Glass resident, returning home later in the evening, discovered the fire, and immediately got in touch with the constable, D. McLean, who along with a local fire-fighting team, was soon on the spot.  It was thought expedient, however, to send for the Huntly Fire Brigade about 11.8 pm.  The Huntly crew, under leading fireman J. Fraser, promptly went into action and were on their way to the scene of the outbreak about 11.16 pm.  When they arrived the fire had been got under control, but the brigade remained on the spot until the danger was past.

The piano, which was presented to the parish by the late Sir Frederick Bridge, was destroyed, and some damage was done by fire and water to the stage and to the partition between the hall and the adjoining ante-rooms.

From the Huntly Express  March 20 1942

PUBLIC NOTICES

GLASS PARISH HALL COMMITTEE desire to thank the Members of the National Fire Service (Huntly Station) and all those who rendered assistance at the recent outbreak of fire.

NOTICE – GLASS PARISH HALL

The COMMITTEE    hereby make public notice that the HALL will be CLOSED for public functions meantime.

From the Huntly Express May 8 1942

DISPLENISH SALE OF

FARM STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, ETC.

AT NEWTON OF GLENMARKIE, GLASS

(Belonging to Mr Robert Duncan)

On THURSDAY FIRST, 14TH MAY 1942

Comprising –

STOCK – Mare, mid aged; 9 Cows with Calves at foot; 1 Dairy Cow; 13 Yearlings: 1 Two-year old A.-A. Bull; and a number of Poultry

IMPLEMENTS ETC.

Fordson Tractor, Cockshutt Plough, 5-Tined Grubber, Tractor Cart and Frame, Tractor Drill Plough (3 drills), Tractor Harrow Yoke, Paraffin and Oil Drums and Barrels, Set Cart and Plough Harness, Odd Harness, 2 Box Carts and Frames, Wood Cart, Sledge, 2 Drill Ploughs, 3 Single Ploughs, 3 Drill Harrows, Drill Grubber, 3-Tined Grubber, S.T. Harrows, 2 Sets Iron Harrows, Chain Harrows, Broad-cast Sower, Manure Distributor.  Metal Roller, Turnip-Sower, Horse Rake, Hay Turner, Barn Fan, Sack Barrow, Bessemer and Weights, Box and Peat Barrows, Yokes and Swingletrees, Turnip Cutter, Oilcake Breaker, Sheep and Cattle Feeding Boxes, Sheep Nets and Stakes, Barn and Stable Requisites, Fencing Tools, Fencing Wire, Netting Wire, Grindstone, Ladders, Hen-houses, large assortment of Blacksmith’s and Carpenter’s Tools; Blacksmith’s Bellows, Turning Lathe, Peat Spades, Incubator (100-Egge size), Hoover and Lamps, Kitchen Furniture and Dairy Utensils, etc.

Sale to commence with Hand Tools at Eleven o’clock.  Terms cash.

Mrs Hepburn, Royal Oak, Dufftown, will supply refreshments.

        THE ELGIN MARKET GREEN AUCTION COY., LTD., ELGIN

 

DISPLENISH SALE AT QUARRYHEAD, GLASS

ON TUESDAY, 19TH MAY 1942

Effects belonging to the late Mr John Jamieson, as follows –

Black Cow, 6 years old; Black Cow, 4 years old (good milker); 2 18-month old Stots: 2 Yearling Stots; 2 Calves, 30 Head Young Poultry.

2 Box Carts, with Rubber Tyres, D.B. Plough, M.P. Plough, Sock Plough, Harrows, Grubber, Spring-timed Harrows, Turnip-Sower, Cart and Plough Harness, Stone Roller; Shoulder Rake, Hasher, Ladders, Peat Barrow, Barn Fan, Jumbo Engine and Small Mill, 50 Gallon Paraffin Drum with Paraffin, Sledge, Water Troughs, Rick Posts, Strainers, Netting and Barbed Wire, Wire Pulleys, Yokes and Swingletrees, Posts, etc.

Kitchen Dresser, Arm Chairs, Tables, Bed Chair, 6 x 4 B.R. Bed and Spring, 7 Piece Suite in Leather Cloth, Blanket Chest, Straw Mattresses, Pots, Pans, Churns, Potatoes, etc. etc.

Sale to commence at Two p.m.

  1. DEMPSTER, Auctioneer

From the Huntly Express March 13 1942

HUNTLY AND DISTRICT MEN IN THE FAR EAST

During the past few days news has been received that the following soldiers from Huntly and district have been reported missing following the fall of SINGAPORE.

Among them was  –

L/Cpl. William Angus, son of Barbara Jamieson and grandson of the late John Jamieson and Mrs Jamieson, Quarryhead Glass.  He joined the Gordon Highlanders in 1936 and served in Malaya for three years.  Previous to that he was a farm servant in the Huntly district.  He is twenty three years of age and unmarried.

May 29 1942

 GLASS  W.R.I.

At the business meeting of the W.R/I., reports were read by the secretary and treasurer, which were satisfactory.  Mrs Gammie and party from Forgue entertained the members.  Mrs Gammie gave a talk on the life of a stewardess on board a big liner.  She also played selections on the mandolin.  Miss McLean sang several songs, accompanied by Mrs Cumming, Forgue.  The competition was for the best eggs, the winners being – White – Mrs McBain, 2 Mrs Mackie;  Brown – 1 Miss P. Thomson, 2 Mrs Main.  Another competition was a “Sing, Say or Twopence Pay”, when Mrs Ingleby was the winner.  Votes of thanks were given by Mrs Duncan.  Tea hostesses were Mrs McBain, Mrs Gardyne and Mrs Fraser, all of Beldorney.

From the Huntly Express July 3 1942

GLASS PARENTS’ REPRESENTATIVE

A meeting of parents was held in Glass Public School on Wednesday evening for the purpose of appointing a parents’ representative for the parish of Glass to act on the School Management Committee for the area in place of the late Rev. W.G. Guthrie.  Mr John Stuart, solicitor, chairman of Huntly, S.M.C., presided, and was accompanied by Mr G.F. Dickson, clerk to the Committee.  Mrs Main, Lilac Cottage, seconded by Mr J. Smith, Home Farm, Blairmore, moved the appointment of Mr J.A. Ingleby, Blairmore.  There were no other nominations.

From the Huntly Express July 10 1942

PRISONERS HELD BY JAPS

HOW TO ADDRESS LETTERS

Almost as soon as the first British soldier fell into the hands of the Japanese the Post Office began work on a plan to secure postal communication with prisoner camps in the Far East.  Final arrangements have yet to be made, but it is hoped that the first bags of mail will soon be on their way outwards.

To avoid delay while Japanese agreement to the proposed arrangements is awaited, letters and postcards addressed as shown below can be posted now in the ordinary way for transmission to prisoners of war in Japanese hands and civilians in Japanese occupied territories.  These letters and postcards should bear the words “Prisoners of War Post” in the top left hand corner, and postage need not be prepaid.  The name and address of the sender should be written on the back of the envelope.

For prisoners of war the address should be in the following form;-

NAVY;

Officers – Rank, Initials, Name (in block letters), R.N. (R.N.R. or R.N.V.R.) Name of ship

ARMY:

Officers – Rank, Initials, Name (in block letters)

Name of Regiment or Corps. (The number of the battalion, etc. most not be mentioned)

Locality where last serving or last heard of

Other Ranks – Personal No., Rank, Initials, Name (in block letters)

Name of Regiment or Corps. (The number of the battalion, etc., must not be mentioned)

Locality where last serving or last heard of.

AIR FORCE;

Officers – Rank, Initials, Name (in block letters) R.A.F. etc.

Locality where last serving or last heard of

Airmen – Personal No., Rank, Initials, Name (in block letters) R.A.F. etc.

Locality where last serving or last heard of.

LOCAL DEFENCE FORCES;

Name (in block letters proceeded by initials)

Name of unit

Hong Kong (or Malaya, as the case may be)

In all the above cases the address should be completed as follows:-

British Prisoner of War,

c/o Prisoners of War Information Bureau, Tokyo.

For civilians the letters and postcards should bear the words “Prisoners of War Post” and the form of address should be:-

Name (in block letters proceeded by initials) followed by the last known address

Malaya(or Burma, Hong Kong, China, etc.

Only letters and postcards may be posted; parcels and other packets will not be forwarded.  Relatives and friends are asked to make their letter brief and to write clearly; non-observance of this advice may not only result in non-delivery of individual letters but also cause delay to others.

This arrangement is provisional.  When the final details are settled the G.P.O. will issue some further information.

From the Huntly Express September 25 1942

GLASS

“THEIR DAY” – A successful whist drive and dance was held in aid of the Soldiers’ Sailors@ and Airmen’s Dependents Association by the Glass W.R.I. instead of the usual flag day.  The sum of £19.2s.10d. was handed over to the Association.

From the Huntly Express October 30 1942

IN AIR OF GLASS CHURCH FUNDS

MILITARY WHIST AND DANCE

Will be held in GLASS HALL

On Friday 6th November

Whist commencing 7.30 pm

Captains providing tables, free

Dance commencing 10 p.m. (approx.)

Excellent Band in attendance

Elimination Fox-trot

Tea will be sold during Dance

Admission Whist and Dance 2/6: Dance 1/-

  1. Horne, Secretary

From the Huntly Express November 13 1942

GLASS

DANCE – The proceeds of the dance held in the Public Hall recently by Messrs C. Stewart and F. Watt in aid of Glass Youth Club amounted to £16.15s.   £8.15s. went to the Club funds and the balance of £8 was handed to Mrs Ingleby, Invermarkie Lodge, for the local Comforts Fund.  The winner of the elimination fox-trot were Mr G. Simpson and Mrs J. Duncan.

 

From the Huntly Express January 15 1943

FARMS TO LET

Aberdeenshire

BLAIRMORE ESTATE

To let, with entry  at Whitsunday 1943 the following FARMS in the PARISH OF GLASS

1 FARM of NETHER HILTON and NETHER HILTON CROFT, extending to 94 Acres Arable or thereby and 13 ACRES PASTURE or thereby, at present tenanted by Mr Robert Bagrie.

2 FARM of BAREFOLDS, extending to 75 Acres Arable or thereby and 12 Acres Pasture thereby, at present in the hands of the Proprietor.

CAIRNBORROW ESTATE

TO LET, with Entry at Whitsunday 1943, the FARM OF WESTFOLDS and BLACKLUG, in the PARISH OF GLASS, extending to 85 Acres Arable or thereby and 18 Acres Pasture or thereby, at present tenanted by Messrs John Lemon and George Lemon.

The above measurements are not guaranteed, but are believed to be correct.  The buildings are suitable for the Farms and are in good condition.

Mr Colin Calder, Blairmore Estate Office, Glass, will point out the boundaries on receiving two days previous notice and further particulars will be given either by him or by the Subscribers.

STEWART A. McISAAC, W.S. Elgin

Banffshire

BLAIRMORE ESTATE

TO LET, with entry at Whitsunday 1943, THE FARM of SLOGAN in the PATISH OF BOTRIPHNIE, extending to 78 Acres Arable or thereby and 27 Acres Pasture or thereby, at present tenanted by Mr A.S. Morrison.

The above measurements are not guaranteed but are believed to be correct.  The Buildings are suitable for the Farm and are in good condition.

Mr Colin Calder, Blairmore Estate Office, Glass, will point out the boundaries on receiving two days previous notice and further particulars will be given either by him or by the Subscribers.

STEWART A. McISAAC  W.S. Elgin

From the Huntly Express February 12 1943

GLASS CONCERT

A SUCCESSFUL CONCERT WAS GIVEN BY Mr Harry Nicoll’s party in the Public Hall on Friday under the auspices of the Glass committee of the Scottish Red Cross Agriculture Fund.  The hall was filled to capacity.  The chairman (the Rev Hugh Mackenzie) in his opening remarks referred to Mr Nicoll’s kindness in bringing such a talented party to Glass, and said the object of the effort was to raise funds for the Red Cross, which was doing such good work for members of the armed forces and prisoners of war.  The following artists contributed to the programme – Misses Kelman, Ironside and Davidson, Messrs H. Nicoll, N. Davidson, W. Gammie, J. Laurie and P. Milne.  Mr D. Watson was accompanist.   All the items were enthusiastically received.   Following the concert, gifts etc. were auctioned by Mr A. Yule and the funds considerably swelled thereby.   A successful dance followed, music for which was supplied by Forbes’ Band.   A detailed account of the proceeds will be given later, but we understand the Fund will benefit to the extent of over £40.   Mr C. Calder was the secretary in charge of the arrangements.

February 26 1943

PRISONERS OF WAR APPEAL

Among the contributors towards this fund were –

Sir Thomas W. Birkett, Beldorney, Glass £25

Glass Youth Club proceeds of concert £17.13s.11d.

Mr J.A. Paterson, Duke St Huntly sale of flowers gifted by Mrs J. Ingleby £1.17s.6d.

From sale of vegetables grown by Mr W. Ker, Cairnborrow Lodge, Glass £0.17s.3d.

Glass Youth Club and W.R.I. £2.14s.9d.                                                                                             0d.

Mrs Gauld, Blackbog £1.0s.0d.

From sale of hen gifted by Mr Murphy, Parkhead £0.14s.

IN AID OF GLASS SCHOOL FUNDS

A DANCE will be held in GLASS HALL on FRIDAY 5th March

Doors open 8.30 pm

Finlay’s Band  Novelty Dances

Tea will be served

Watt and Henderson, Joint Secretaries

From the Huntly Express February 1943

CAIRNIE TRAGEDY

THREE BOYS KILLED

A tragedy which cast gloom over the district occurred at Cairnie on Saturday evening when three young boys met their death.

The boys had gone to play on a piece of rough ground near the farm of Little Daugh and had picked up an object which they commenced to examine.  Apparently they had used a penknife to do so with the result that an explosion occurred, killing three of the boys and injuring a fourth in the right arm.

The boys killed were William (12 ½)  and David Innes (11), sons of Mr William Innes, farm grieve, Auchanachy, Cairnie and Ronald Neish (11) son of Mr Alexander Neish, storeman, Gerriemuir Cottage, Cairnie.

A brother of the dead Innes boys – Douglas aged seven – received serious injuries to his right arm, while another brother, George Innes aged six, escaped without injury.

William and David Innes were killed instantaneously, but Ronald Neish lived for about an hour, and although terribly injured, pluckily told George Innes to run home and bring help.

The funeral of the two Innes boys took place from Huntly Cottage Hospital on Tuesday to Ruthven Churchyard and was largely attended.  The Home Guard was represented by Major Spence: Capt. Farquharson: Lieut. Watt, C.S.M. Proudfoot. Sgt. Charles and Sgt. MacDonald.  Cairnie School children attended under their headmaster Mr C.R. McPherson and Ruthven School children under Mr A.W. Smart, headmaster.

The Rev. James Campbell, Cairnie, conducted an impressive service at the hospital and also officiated at the graveside.

Ronald Neish, who was a pupil at the Gordon Schools, was buried in Huntly Cemetery on Wednesday, the funeral taking place from the residence of his grandmother, Mrs Thom, 6 Meadow Street.  The classmates of the deceased boy attended the funeral, while Major Spence and Captain Farquharson represented the Home Guard.

March 10 1943

FARMS TO LET

Estate of Edinglassie

(Parish of Mortlach)

To let with entry at Whitsunday 1943 the Farm of Easter Braeton presently in occupation of Commander Pinsent.   Extent 42 acres or thereby arable and 45 acres or thereby rough pasture.  Good Dwelling House and Steading.  Boundaries will be pointed out by Mr Alex Black, Grieve, Easter Braeton, Glass and Conditions of let may be had from Messes Cochran & Macpherson, Advocates 152 Union Street, Aberdeen who will receive offers up to Saturday 10th April.

Farm in the Parish of Glass to Let

To let with entry at Whitsunday 1943 the Farm of Backside and Whitestone on the Estate of Beldorney as presently let to Mr Robert Jessiman who is not an offerer.

The Farm extends to 104 Acres arable and 67 Acres pasture, but these measurements are not guaranteed.

The Boundaries will be pointed out by the present tenant and Conditions of let may be had from Messrs Cochran & Macpherson, Advocates, 152 Union Street, Aberdeen, who will receive offers up to Saturday 3rd April.

From the Huntly Express March 10 1943

GLASS

A meeting will be held in Glass Parish Hall on Monday 22nd to arrange a Petition for Bus Service between Glass and Huntly, will those interested come at 7.30.

From the Huntly Express March 12 1943

UNEXPLODED BOMBS

WARNING!

The recent tragedy at Cairnie in which three children lost their lives as the result of an explosion again emphasises the danger which lurks in our countryside from live shells, mortar bombs and grenades.  The field Army and Home Guard alike are armed extensively with explosives of all kinds and it is necessary for them to prepare themselves for battle by constant practice in their use.  Every possible precaution is taken to safeguard the public against danger from these weapons, but still accidents are, unfortunately, only too common all over the country.  The last final and probably the most efficient safeguard against accident is the education of the public and particularly the children in the danger of touching or handling any such bomb or any unfamiliar object.  Unless this lesson is learned these tragedies will continue.

It is the duty of the Forces to keep a check on every round of ammunition and to render safe any shell, bomb or grenade which fails to explode, by destroying it where it lies.  The only possible method of carrying this out is to lay an explosive charge against the “blind” shell or grenade and explode it.  This should detonate the shell and does so in practically every case, but it is possible that it may be fractured into a number of pieces and complete demolition not take place.  Some dangerous or even lethal fragments may be blown some distance.  It is impossible for personnel carrying out these demolitions to be absolutely certain that this has not taken place.  This is a thousand to one chance, but it is believed that the recent tragedy was as a result of such a chance.

Complete safety can never be achieved in the handling of explosives.  It is impossible to eliminate human error altogether, but the greatest safeguard the public can have is the knowledge that such lethal things can now be encountered in the country and that they must not be touched on any account.  It is a national duty to make everyone and most particularly children, aware of this danger, especially now when the enemy is reported to be dropping small anti-personnel grenades from aircraft.

March 17th 1943

HOME GUARD FINED £5

Failed to attend parade

Nine Aberdeen Home Guards were charged at Aberdeen Sheriff Court last Thursday with having failed to attend parades.  Four pleaded guilty and fines ranging from £3 to £5 were imposed.  The five who pleaded not guilty will appear later for trial.

Norman Massie, Newton of Glenmarkie, Glass, who was ordered to parade on various dates and failed to do so, said he had cattle to attend to and had no one to relieve him.  He was fined £5.

The sheriff said Massie and others must realise that they had to attend parades, and if they were prevented from doing so because of their work, they would have to try to arrange for others to undertake their duties.

GLASS

PPUBLIC MEETING – It will be observed that an important public meeting is called for Monday of next week, the business being “to arrange a petition for bus service between Glass and Huntly”

DANCE – A successful dance was held in the Public Hall in aid of Glass School Funds, the sum of £6.3s.2d. being handed over.  The prize for the best matched couple went to L/Cpl. Brebner and Miss Anita Milne, while the elimination waltz prize winners were Mr J. Oliver and Miss L. Thomson.  The arrangements were in the hands of ex-pupils with F. Watt and I. Henderson as joint secretaries.

From the Huntly Express April 2 1943

GLASS

BEE LECTURES – In the Public Hall Miss M. Logan, North of Scotland College of Agriculture, gave an interesting and instructive series of bee lectures.  During her talks, Miss Logan gave a vivid description of bee life and what was required for the proper and profitable management of an apiary.

She had an interesting selection of lantern slides and described each picture in a masterful way.  Talking of bee disease, Miss Logan impressed upon her audience that it was their duty to become acquainted with all of them, especially that very formidable one, foul brood.  On the concluding night, Miss Logan answered many questions asked of her.  A cup of tea was enjoyed by all, after which Mr Barron proposed a vote of thanks to Miss Logan.

GLASS

In aid of PRISONERS OF WAR FUNDS

GRAND DANCE

(By Blairmore Boys)

Will be held in GLASS PUBLIC HALL

On Friday 9th April

Commencing at 8.30 pm

Tea will be served

Novelty Dances

Admission – Gents 2/6d. Ladies 2/- Forces 1/6d

Notman, Secy.

From the Huntly Express 2 April

GLASS PARISH CHURCH

In aid of Funds

CONCERT

Will be held in

PARISH HALL, GLASS

On Wednesday 7th April

At 9 pm; doors open at 7.30 pm

CONCERT PARTY FROM DUFFTOWN

Programmes will include Solos, Duets, Trios, Quartets, Violin, Piano and Saw Selections

Humorous Sketch

Dance, including Cake Walk

Chairman – Rev. Hugh Mackenzie

A Dance will follow – Forbes’ Band

Admission – Concert 2/6d. 1/6d. Children 9d.

Dance 1/-

 

From the Huntly Express April 9 1943

GLASS HOME GUARD

The Committee responsible for the Social Evening held recently wish to thank Messrs W. Howieson, F. Mitchell, F. Watt, James Cruickshank and Son Ltd. Of Huntly and Members of the Home Guard, for their generous donations.  The Prisoners of War Fund benefited by £15.4s.6d.

TONIGHT

IN AID OF PRISONERS OF WAR FUNDS

GRAND DANCE

(By Blairmore Boys)

Will be held in the Glass Public Hall
On Friday 9th April commencing at 8.30pm
Tea will be served
Novelty Dance

Admission – Gents 2/6: Ladies 2/-: Forces 1/6

G Norman, Secy.

From the Huntly Express April 16 1943

GLASS

LEFT HIS JOB

A fine of £3 with the alternative of 14 days in prison was imposed by Sheriff Laing, Aberdeen on James Watt, Newton of Glenmarkie for leaving his employment as a horseman without permission.

May 7 1943

IN AID OF GLASS & CABRACH DISTRICT NURSING ASSOCIATION AND THE BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICE

HUNTLY F.F. DRAMATIC CLUB

Will present

“MYSTERY AT GREENFINGERS”

(by J.B. Priestly)

In GLASS PARISH HALL

On FRIDAY 14th MAY

Doors open 7.30: commence at 8pm

Chairman –

Comm. Pinsent, Edinglassie Lodge

Admission 2/6 and 1/6: Children 6d.

DANCE TO FOLLOW – Admission 1/-

Reid’s Band, Dufftown

May 21 1943

THE HOME GUARD

READY FOR WAR’S MOST VITAL PHASE

The Home Guard now entered its fourth year of life, is on the threshold of what may prove to be the most momentous phase of its existence.  The United Nations are of the offensive.   More and more men from the Field Force must inevitably go overseas.   The Home Guard, now trained and efficient, grows in importance as Britain’s bodyguard against counter-attack, whether by airborne troops, parachutist saboteurs or seaborne invasion.

May 14th was the third anniversary of its formation.  May 16 was celebrated throughout the country, as Home Guard Sunday, when there was staged parades and demonstrations designed to illustrate the efficiency of this force both in the use of weapons and in tactics.

In the evening of May 14 1940 Mr Eden broadcast a call to all able-bodied men to defend their country.   They rallied from every town and village.  For the most part unarmed, untrained and lacking efficient control, they were none the less ready to die if the  threatened invasion came to pass.   Day after day went by.  Every hour was used to train and to arm.  But the task of fitting out an army that had sprung into life in a night was herculean.  1940 ended with the force better equipped and trained than in May of that year, but much was left to do.

That which remained has now, to a great extent, been done.  The stepping up of Home Guard training during the past year shows how in three years a part time force has been brought into a high state of military effectiveness.

Intensive training has been given in the use of the Sten, E.Y. Rifle, Northover, Spigot, Lewis and other guns, besides shooting with a rifle on the range.   More practice ammunition is now available.  Live grenade throwing has been a feature of the year’s training.

Every Home Guard battalion and very many companies have now appointed medical officers.  They are civil practitioners who are granted Home Guard commissions, subject to the approval of local medical war committees.

Woman are now authorised to assist the Home Guard as auxiliaries.  They act as clerks, drivers, or cooks.  They will not wear uniform, but will be distinguished by a small broach.

May 21st 1943

GLASS W.R.I.

MINISTRY OF INFORMATION

TALK ON CZECHOSLOVAKIA

(Speaker: Miss JURINA ASEROVA)

IN GLASS PARISH HALL

ON MONDAY 24th MAY

At Eight pm

All interested invited to attend.

 

21 May 1943

IN AIR OF HALL FUNDS

GRAND TERM DANCE

Will be held in

GLASS PUBLIC HALL

ON FRIDAY 28TH MAY

At 8.30 pm

Novelty Dances

Lucky Draw for Admission Ticket

Admission – Gents 2s. Ladies and H.M. Forces 1s.6d.

Finlay’s Band

C Thomson, Secretary

From the Huntly Express 21 May 1943

HOME GUARD ANNIVERSARY

Sunday was celebrated as the third anniversary of the Home Guard throughout Britain and in this connection some four hundred well trained and well equipped men from Huntly and surrounding districts took part in the celebrations at Inverurie of the 2nd Aberdeenshire (Central) Battalion Home Guard.  Col. R.J.B. Yates, D.S.O. D.L. commanding.  A service took place in the Pleasure Park, being conducted by the Rev. Inglis M. Black, M.A., Rev. Alex. S. Crichton, M.O. and Rev. J.W. Harriman.  The service was an impressive one and was taken part in by a number of the general public.  It opened with the singing of the 100th Psalm, followed by the lesson, prayer for the King’s Forces, Hymn, “Fight the Good Fight”, the Lord’s Prayer, concluding with the National Anthem and the benediction.  Afterwards the Battalion, numbering over 1500 and headed by pipes and drums, marched through the town, the salute being taken at the Town Hall.  Hundreds of spectators lined the streets as the long column swung along past the saluting base.  The parade from Huntly included contingents from GLASS, CAIRNIE, DRUMBLADE, YTHAN WELLS AND FORGUE.  A large number of spectators turned out to see them march from the Drill Hall to the railway station.

 

May 28th 1943

GLASS

PLAY “Mystery at Greenfingers” by J.B. Priestly, was presented by Huntly F.P. Dramatic Club in Glass Hall on Friday 14th May, before a large and appreciative audience, who were delighted with the acting.  Commander Pinsent of Edinglassie Lodge occupied the chair.  The entertainment was in aid of the Glass and Cabrach District Nursing Association and the  Blood Transfusion Service.  The total proceeds amounted to £40.8s.11d.  Reid’s band, Dufftown supplied music at the dance which followed.

From the Huntly Express July 9 1943

GLASS

HOME GUARDSMAN FINED

A fine of £5 with the alternative of 30 days imprisonment was imposed by Sheriff McDonald at Aberdeen yesterday on William Duff, Asswanly, a member of the Home Guard, for failing to attend parades on various dates between February 3 and June 9th.

From the Huntly Express July 16 1943

MISSING SOLDIER

Intimation has been received from him by his mother, that L/Cpl. William Angus is a prisoner of war in Japanese hands and is in good health and spirits.  L/Cpl. Angus, who is twenty-four years of age, was a regular soldier, having served seven years in the Gordon Highlanders.  He is a grandson of the late Mr and Mrs Jamieson, Quarryhead, Glass.

From the Huntly Express August 13 1943

GLASS

In Aid of THE HALL FUNDS

Dance will be held in

Glass Public Hall

On Saturday 21st August

Forbes’ Band

Novelty Dances

Admission – Ladies 1/-: Gents and H.M. Forces 1/6d.

Gordon and D. Smith, Joint Secretaries

Huntly Express September 2 1943

GLASS DANCE

As the result of a successful dance held in the Parish Hall, the hall funds have benefited by the sun of

£6.18s. 6d.   The joint secretaries were Messrs D. Smith and W. Gordon.

PICNIC

The annual picnic of the W.R.I. members and their children was held at Edinglassie Lodge.  Mrs Pinsent kindly saw to all the arrangements for the children’s entertainment.  Games of all kinds and a treasure hunt were enjoyed.  Mrs Watson, Schoolhouse, thanked Mrs Pinsent for her kindness and Mrs Barclay thanked Miss Bateson, who organised the games, etc.  Prizes were given by Mrs Pinsent.

DEMONSTRATION

At the W.R.I. Mrs Dunbar, Rhynie, gave a demonstration on the making of soft toys.  She also gave a fine display of finished ones.  The re-blocking of an old felt hat was another hint she gave the Institute.  Before tea was served, Mrs Dunbar also gave a competition.  The winners being – Miss Campbell, Invermarkie  Lodge: Miss Mackenzie, The Manse; Mrs McBain, Beldorney Cottage and Miss Bateson, Edinglassie Lodge.  Hostesses were Mrs Duncan, Mrs Smith and Mrs Barclay.  Votes of thanks were given by Mrs Ingleby who presided and Mrs Duncan.

 

Huntly Express September 24 1943

THE HOME GUARD

TOO MANY REGULATIONS

What is happening in the Home Guard asks John Brophy, in a challenging article in the “Sunday Graphic”.

“Some units,” says Mr Brophy, “have been or are in the process of being disbanded.  The reason for this disbanding, I understand, is that a large number of men in these units are employed for sixty or more hours a week on civil work ranked as vital to the war effort.   Then, again, almost every member of the Home Huard has personal knowledge of numbers of men, apparently not old or unfit, who so far as can be discovered, are walking about in perfect freedom and doing nothing whatever for national defence.  The effect of all this is that the Home Guard is losing its keenness.

“Another important factor which saps away enthusiasm is the change of atmosphere within the Home Guard itself.  This springs from over-organisation.  There are far too many regulations.  Put together they form a library and it is almost impossible nowadays for any Home Guard order to be given without consulting page so and so, paragraph so and so.

“What are the remedies?  First, I suggest a boiling down and simplification of all the regulations.  On top of that it needs to be emphasised once again in the highest quarters that only a minimum of these regulations are to be regarded as absolute orders and the remainder as general directions to be adapted according to circumstances and local needs.   The battalion and the company are the only sub-divisions of the Home Guard which are essential for its operational role.  Fewer and simpler regulations are urgently needed to restore that initiative and independent spirit of units which was the main-spring of the high morale of 1940-41.

“Secondly, the Home Guard needs more weapons and more modern weapons.

“I suggest that in future the forty-eight hour average should be applied only to Home Guard recruits who have not yet completed their training and passed their proficiency test.  For trained men a far shorter period is necessary.”

 From the Huntly Express  October 15 1943

GLASS

W.R.I. VARIETY – The W.R.I. meeting took the form of an entertainment taken part in by the president, Mrs Pinsent of Edinglassie, Miss Bateson, Master Ewen Pinsent, Miss Millicent Fiddes, Boghead, and Mrs James Duncan, Edinglassie.  Miss Bateson and Master Ewen Pinsent gave a duet; Master Ewen Pinsent, a piece of his own composition; and Miss Millicent Fiddes sang and also gave a selection of Scots music.  Mrs J. Duncan also played for the community singing and sang a solo.  Charades were acted by Mrs Pinsent, Miss Bateson and Master Ewen Pinsent.

 From the Huntly Express October 29 1943

THEY COME HOME

STRATHBOGIE MEN REPATRIATED

Many full hearts – wives, sweethearts, friends – welcomed back to Britain and home this week, the first batch of repatriated men from Germany.

A great reception awaited them as they landed at Leith and Liverpool.  Our King and Queen sent a gracious message of greeting which was read by the Adjutant-General  Sir R.F. Adam, who went out to the ships, Drottningholm and Empress of Russia, as they lay in the Forth estuary.

The nation’s heart has gone out to these men – heroes one and all- who in the spring of 1940, stood between us and a terrible peril, the extent of which even now we do not fully realise.

Many of them crippled or sick, they return, not as captives, but as victors.  The nation must never forget them.

Many Aberdeen shire men are included in this first contingent, amongst them two from the Strathbogie district – Corporal Robert Brander, Bogie Street and the Rev. G. C. McCutcheon, minister of Drumblade.

A wonderful tribute to the latter was given by a 60 year old Army padre, who was one of the repatriated.  “I can tell you the boys in the camp simply loved him” he said.

Corporal Brander is at present in the South of England, but hopes to arrive in Huntly during the weekend.

Captain G.C. McCutcheon arrived at Drumblade last night.  Our representative, who was one of the first to greet him on arrival, found him in a most happy mood.  In an interview he referred to the very great value of the parcels sent by the Red Cross.  He said that the parcels were in no way tampered with by the Germans and reached the men intact.  He also spoke of the help given by the Y.M.C.A. in sending out musical instruments and music, allowing the men to have concerts and entertainment in the camps.  He said that in the early days splendid work was done by Mrs Campbell, a British lady living in Portugal, who sent a large quantity of parcels to our men before the time they were able to get through from this country.  Good work was also done by the British Legion in Geneva.

Captain McCutcheon said the spirit of the officers and men is very high and all are very grateful for what is done for them from this country. “Scotsmen retain the spirit of the old country and keep Burns Night and New Year and our festival nights.

“At one camp I was in,” he said, “there was a first-class pipe band.  Life of course, is not altogether pleasant, but all make the best of it.  We had a splendid journey home through Sweden and were given a wonderful reception at Leith which impressed us very much.  “  I hope” concluded Captain McCutcheon, “that this is only the beginning of repatriation and that many other contingents will follow.  The wave of farewell given us by our colleagues left behind was courageous in the extreme.”

From the Huntly Express November 18 1943

IN AID OF CHURCH FUNDS

GRAND DANCE

Will be held in

GLASS PUBLIC HALL

On Friday 28th November

Commencing 8.30 pm

McWilliam’s Band

Lucky Draw for Admission Ticket

Novelty Dances – Refreshments sold

Admission – Gents 2s 6d. Ladies 2s. H.M. Forces 1s 6d.

Thomson and I. Henderson, Joint Secretaries

From the Huntly Express November 26th 1943

GLASS W.R.I.

A BASKET MILITARY WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE

Will be held in

GLASS PARISH HALL

On Friday 3rd December

At 7.30 pm

Whist Drive and Dance 2/6d.

Whist only 1/6d. – Dance only 1/-

Forbes’ Band

Donations for Aid to Russia Fund will be gratefully received.

Huntly Express  December 3 1943

IN AID OF HOME GUARD FUNDS

A GRAND DANCE

Will be held in Glass Public Hall on Friday 10th December commencing 8.30.

Forbes’ Band

Admission: Gents 2/-: Ladies and H.M. Forces 1/6

Cpl. Duncan and L/Cpl Aitken, Joint Secretaries

Huntly Express December 10 1943

SCOTTISH RED CROSS AGRICULTURE FUND

GLASS DISTRICT

GRAND CONCERT

BY BARRY NICOLL’S CONCERT PARTY

(In aid of above) will be held in

GLASS PUBLIC HALL

ON FRIDAY 17th December

Chairman – Commander CLIVE PINSENT, Edinglassie

Doors open 7.30pm: Concert 8 prompt

Tickets 2/6 and 1/6

Concert to be immediately followed by

FREE GIFT SALE

Of Live Stock, Agricultural Produce, etc. to be conducted by Mr Alexander Yule: and

DANCE

Tickets 1/6  –  Forbes’ Band

All Donations in cash or kind gratefully received.

 

Huntly Express December 21 1943

GLASS

FOR THE RED CROSS

We understand that the drawings from the concert, free gift sale and dance held recently in Glass Public Hall in aid of the Scottish Red Cross Agriculture Fund amounted to over £110, to which has to be added the farm levies collected, making a grand total of over £258.  The sum, less expenses, is being handed over to the Fund.  The committee wish to thank all who contributed to make the function the success it was.

Huntly Express January 14 1944

GLASS

LIGHTING OFFENCE

Donald Brown, farm manager, Home Farm, Invermarkie, was fined £2, with the alternative of fourteen days’ imprisonment, by Sheriff Laing at Aberdeen yesterday for a lighting offence.  He pleaded guilty by letter to causing or permitting, George Simpson, tractor driver, Home Farm, Invermarkie, to drive a tractor with plough attached on the Huntly-Dufftown public road at 8.30 am on 29th December 1943 without having the regulation lights.

Huntly Express January 14 1944

BLAIRMORE ESTATE

To Let with entry at Whitsunday 1944 and separation of Grain Crop, the following FARMS;-

NETHER HILTON AND NETHER HILTON CROFT, extending to 84 Acres Arable and 13 Acres Rough Grazing, or thereby, as presently tenanted by Mr Robert Bagrie.

OLD MANSE, extending to 80 Acres Arable, or thereby as presently tenanted by Mr Alex. Robertson.

Both Farms are in a good state of cultivation, and conveniently situated close to the Huntly-Dufftown road about 7 miles from Huntly.  The Dwelling houses and Steadings are in good order and suitable for the holdings.  The present Tenants are not to be offerers.

Additional adjoining acres of Arable or Rough Ground suitable for Sheep out-runs could be Let along with either of the above farms if desired.

For Conditions of Let apply to R.M. ROBERTSON, Blairmore Estate Office, Glass, Huntly, who will arrange for the boundaries being pointed out, and with whom Offers should be lodged.

From the Huntly Express January 28 1944

GLASS

PRISONER OF WAR

A post card has been received from L/Cpl. William Angus, grandson of the late Mr and Mrs Jamieson, Quarryhead, stating that he is a prisoner in Japanese hands in Thailand Camp No. 4.  L/Cpl Angus, who states he is in good health and working for pay, joined the Gordon Highlanders eight years ago.

From the  Huntly Express  January 28 1944

GLASS

W.R.I. COMPETITIONS

The Institute evening began with a “beetle drive” which was won by 1 – Mrs McLean  2 –Mrs Main.  Afterwards Mrs Pinsent gave a talk on home nursing.  Mrs Ingleby presided.  Tea hostess was Miss C. Gordon, Markethill, who also gave a competition, the winners being Mrs Macpherson and Miss M. Duncan (equal).  Miss O. Gordon, Mrs Shand and Mrs Watson were tea assistants.

 

Huntly Express March 31 1944

IN AID OF GLASS AND CABRACH NURSING ASSOCIATION

DANCE

Will be held in Glass Public Hall

On Friday 31st March at 8.30 pm

Admission – Gents 2/6: Ladies 2/-: Forces 1/6

Refreshments will be sold

Forbes’ Band
Duff and D. Smith, Joint Secretaries

 IN AID OF YOUTH CLUB FUNDS

GRAND DANCE

Will be held in Glass Public Hall

On Friday 7th April commencing 8.30 pm

Hay’s Band – Refreshments sold

Admission; Gents 2/-: Ladies 1/6: H.M. Forces 1/-
Henderson and C Thomson, Joint Secretaries

 From the Huntly Express  April 14 1944

ON BEHALF OF GLASS AND CABRACH DISTRICT NURSING ASSOCIATION

HUNTLY F.P. DRAMATIC CLUB

Present

“CHARITY BEGINS—————“

In PARISH HALL, GLASS

On Friday 21st April

Doors open 7.30 pm: commence at 8

Admission 2/6 and 1/6

Huntly Express April 28 1944

GLASS

PRISONER OF WAR

News has been received that Pte. James McGregor, London Scottish, younger son of Mr and Mrs James McGregor, Roselea Glass is a prisoner of war in Germany, having been captured in the fighting in Italy.  Pte. McGregor, who is well known in the Glass district, was called up some eighteen months ago and served for a time in the Gordon Highlanders, being later transferred to the London Scottish.  Pte. McGregor’s elder brother, Walter, also served in the Gordons, but was discharged some time ago on account of ill-health.

From the Huntly Express June 2 1944

IN AID OF GLASS WELCOME HOME FUND

CONCERT

Will be held in

GLASS PARISH HALL

On Friday 9th June

Commencing 8 pm; doors open 7.30 pm

Admission 2s and 1s 6d. Children 6d

DANCE TO FOLLOW

Hay’s Band    Admission 1s

Stewart, Secretary

From the Huntly Express June 2 1944

GLASS

GIFT TO ELDER

On the occasion of his leaving the district, Mr John Robertson, Old Manse, was waited upon by the members of the Glass Kirk Session and presented with a bible, hymn book and sum of money.  Mr William Duncan, Edinglassie, in handing over the gifts, paid tribute to the long and good service done by Mr Robertson for the Church, and wished him happiness in his new home.  Mr Robertson replied.

From the Huntly Express June 2 1944

“SALUTE THE SOLDIER”

HUNTLY OUT TO BEAT ITS TARGET

Huntly and district have three weeks left to prepare for “Salute the Soldier” week which is to be held from 24th June to 1st July, but already arrangements for the week are taking shape and it is hoped that Strathbogie will again beat its target of £40,000.  The aim is to equip and clothe a base hospital.

The opening ceremony will take place on the Square at four in the afternoon, and the Gordon Highlanders’ Military band will be in attendance.

Etc etc.

The Huntly district includes Rhynie, GLASS, Gartly, Cairnie, Drumblade, Ythanwells and Forgue and all these districts are setting targets which they will endeavour to reach.

GLASS district has set the target at £1000, and a strong committee with Commander Pinsent as chairman, is arranging functions during the week to raise money for a local Welcome Home and Amenities Fund.  On Sunday 25th June, the gardens in the district including Invermarkie, Edinglassie and Blairmore, are to be open to the public.  Throughout the week there will be sports, treasure hunts, dances etc.

It is vital to our soldiers that they should have all the equipment they need, and every resident in the district must do her or his bit by lending all they can.  It’s the least we can do for the lads who are giving so much for us.  Strathbogie’s slogan is

SAVE AND LEAD UNTO THE END

From the Huntly Express June 9 1944

“SALUTE THE SOLDIER”

In aid of WELCOME HOME FUND

RETURN DANCE

Will be held in

GLASS PUBLIC HALL

On Friday 23rd June

Commencing 8.30 pm

Novelty Dances – Beauty Competitions

Refreshments sold

Reid’s Band

Admission – Gents. 2/-: Ladies and H.M. Forces 1/6

Henderson and C. Thomson, Joint Secretaries

From the Huntly Express June 23 1944

SALUTE THE SOLDIER

GLASS DISTRICT

TARGET £1000

Programme of Events

SATURDAY 24th June – Free Gift Sale and General Sports Day.  Opened at 3.30 pm  Teas served.

SUNDAY 25th June – By kind permission, Gardens of Beldorney, Blairmore, Edinglassie & Invermarkie open to public 2 pm – 7 pm.

Entrance 6d. Round Ticket 1/-:  Teas at Invermarkie and Edinglassie.

TUESDAY 27th June – Cycling Treasure Hunt, 7.30 pm

WEDNESDAY 28th June – Grand Home Guard Display. 7.30 pm: also Side Shows, Competitions, etc. at Invermarkie Pony Park.

FRIDAY 30th June – Basket Whist Drive, Parish Hall 7.30 pm.  7/6 per table.  Dance to follow.

From the Huntly Express July 7 1944

“SALUTE THE SOLDIER” WEEK

£92,699  13s  8d.

Strathbogie “Salute the Soldier” week was  a triumph of which we may well be proud.  To beat our “Wings for Victory” total by £20,000, would have been considered impossible by many, but such was the result of this effort.

The country districts have all done splendidly and have greatly exceeded the last year’s total.  The amount raised in each case is:-

Forgue…£8483 1s.3d:  Gartly £2028  15s. 6d.  GLASS £3125  12s. 7d.  Rhynie £3252  4s. 6d.  Ythanwells £1601  3s. 0d.  Drumblade £2246  2s. 6d.  Corse  £390  1s.  0d.

In several districts large sums were also raised by entertainments, etc. for various causes.  Drumblade raised £77 for its Nursing Association: GLASS DISTRICT where enthusiasm was exceptionally high, raised £281. 2s. 7d. for the Glass Welcome Home Fund.

Huntly Express  July 7 1944

GLASS

HOME GUARD DISPLAY

On Wednesday evening of last week, the Home Guard had quite a gala night when they held a display in Invermarkie Pony Park in aid of Salute the Soldier, under the command of Lieut. J. Ingleby.  Drill, bayonet fighting, firing of Sten guns, shot-guns, grenades, Browning and Lewis machine guns, were all included in the programme.  From the spectators’ point of view the most spectacular event was the mock battle which culminated in the enemy” strong-point – a wooden hut – being blown sky-high.  The evening concluded with a rug-of-war competition in which Huntly Home Guard defeated Cairnie Home Guard by two pulls to nil.  Major Spence was commentator during the evening.

From the Huntly Express July 28 1944

SUNDAY 6TH AUGUST

THE GARDENS AT BELDORNEY CASTLE

Will be open to the Public from

3 pm – 7 pm

Admission 1s.  Tea 6d.

By kind permission of Sir Thomas Birkett.

Proceeds to the Glass and Cabrach Nursing Association

From the Huntly Express July 28 1944

IN AID OF PRISONERS OF WAR FUND

GRAND DANCE

Will be held in

GLASS PUBLIC HALL

On Friday, 4th August

Commencing 8.30 pm

Hay’s Band;  Refreshments will be sold

Admission – Gents 2s.6d. Ladies 2s.

Joint Secretaries – C. Thomson and I. Henderson

From the Huntly Express August 11 1944

CLOUDBURST IN CABRACH

FAMILIES MAROONED

One day recently the Lower Cabrach received an unusual visitation in the shape of a cloud-burst somewhere between two points, one in Lesmurdie hill and one about Little Badoch hill.

The Cabrach Burn overflowed its banks till several houses and buildings at Bridgend were swamped, the occupants being marooned therein and obliged to stay put for some time.  A footbridge below Crofthead was swept away.

Further down the GLASS road, the small stream which marks the boundary between the farms of Tombain and Tomballie was a roaring torrent for several hours.  The roadway was blocked and traffic held up for a day, while a large area of grass field below was completely covered by stones and debris.

The dwelling-house at Mains of Lesmurdie was flooded to such an extent that a great deal of furniture had to be removed and the water carried out in buckets.  Crops, too, suffered severely, corn being badly laid and turnip drills water run.

The Burn of Succoth rose to an alarming extent and at one time, it was feared that livestock might be endangered, but fortunately the water fell in due course, leaving them unharmed.

This unusual phenomenon has left marks which will be visible in the Cabrach for generations.

Huntly Express August 25 1944

 WAR CHARITIES ACT 1940

Notice is hereby given that it is proposed to apply to the County Council of the County of Aberdeen for the registration under the above-mentioned Act of the Glass District Welcome Home Fund, the objects of which are as follows;-

To provide assistance, in necessitous cases, to full-time serving men and women on their discharge from Service, any surplus being applied to objects dealing with the social betterment of the community.  The Administrative Centre of the Charity is situate at Edinglassie, Glass, Huntly.

Any objections to the proposed registration should be sent in writing to the above Council within Fourteen Days of the date of this Notice.

Dated 21st August 1944

(Sgd.) CLIVE PINSENT, Commander.

For and on behalf of the above-named Charity.

 

From the Huntly Express September 1 1944

GLASS

WOUNDED IN BURMA

Mr & Mrs McGregor, Roselea have received official intimation that Pte. George Gray Barclay K.O.S.B. has been wounded in Burma.  Pte. Barclay was a Territorial and was called up at the outbreak of war.

Huntly Express  November 3 1944

 

GLASS W.R.I.

M.O.I. FILM SHOW

GLASS PUBLIC HALL

FRIDAY 3rd NOVEMBER 1944

Doors open 7 pm; commence 7.30 pm.

Silver Collection

DANCE TO FOLLOW

In aid of Soldiers: Sailors and Airman’s Families’ Association

Commencing Nine pm

Special Prize for Glass Pin-Up Girl No. 1

Lucky Door Tickets

Hay’s Band

Admission

Gents 2/6d: Ladies 1/6d: H.M. Forces 1/6d.

Tea supplied at Moderate charge

From the Huntly Express November 10 1944

GLASS

W.R.I. At the October meeting, Mr Mitchell, Huntly gave an interesting demonstration on mending umbrellas, repairing china etc.  Mrs Maunder, Huntly, delighted with several songs, accompanied by Mrs Sievewright, Huntly and Mr Mitchell gave recitations.  Mrs W. McBain, Beldorney, was hostess and Mrs Pinsent proposed votes of thanks.  At their open night last Friday, the W.R.I. had a Ministry of Information film show, to which the general public were admitted.  A successful dance followed, the proceeds going to the Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen’s Families Dependants Association.

From the Huntly Express  November 17 1944

GLASS

DANCE – In aid of the Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen’s Families Dependants Association a successful dance was held by Miss Duncan and committee in the Public Hall, when the sum of £22. 14s. 6d. was handed over for this good cause.  Miss Sheila Robertson was voted Glass’s Pin-up Girl, and Mr and Mrs Summers won the statue waltz.  Mr C. Thomson was M.C. and Hay’s band played.

From the Huntly ExpressNovember 24 1944

GLASS

EARL HAIG FUND – The sum collected this year for the Earl Haig Fund amounted to £13 14s. 1d.  The following pupils of Beldorney and Glass schools acted as collectors – G. Gauld, C. Cormack, K. Smith, H. Murray, G. Cormack, G. Aitken, W. Pauley, D. Gauld, G. Gauld, G. Milne, K. Wood, H. McIrvine, M. Fiddes, S. McIrvine and J. Burgess.

From the Huntly Express 15 December 1944

 GLASS W.R.I.

A BASKET

MILITARY WHIST DRIVE

And DANCE

will be held in GLASS PARISH HALL

On Friday 22nd December at 7.30 pm

Whist Drive and Dance 2s.6d.

Hostess providing basket. 1s (whist only)

Whist only 1s.6d.  Dance only 1s.

J Finlay’s Band

Huntly Express 15 December 1944

IN AID OF YOUTH CLUB FUNDS

GRAND HOGMANAY DANCE

Will be held in

GLASS PUBLIC HALL

On Friday 29th December

Commencing 8.30 pm

Hay’s Band

Admission – Gents 2s.6d.  Ladies 2s.

H.M. Forces 1s.6d.

C Thomson, Secretary

 

Huntly Express  December 20 1944

GLASS

WHIST AND DANCE

A military whist drive and dance was held by the W.R.I. in the Parish Hall.  Mr McLean was time-keeper and the winning tables were – 1 Mrs Shand (Captain) with Mr Shand, Mrs Gardyne and Miss Burberry: 2 Mrs Duncan, Westerpark (Captain) with Messrs J. Innes, A. Burgess and A. Horne;  Consolation – Mrs F. Robertson (Captain) with Messrs F. Robertson, F. Robertson jun. and G. Simpson.  Prizes by Mrs Ingleby, Mrs Pinsent and Mrs McLean were presented by Mrs Watson, Schoolhouse.  Mr C. Thomson was dance M.C. and Mr P. Shand, doorkeeper.  Music for the dance was by J. Finlay’s band.

Huntly Express 22 December 1944

PUBLIC NOTICES

GLASS PARISH CHURCH

DRAMATIC & MUSICAL EVENING

Will be held in

GLASS PARISH HALL

On Friday 12th January

DANCE TO FOLLOW

Particulars later

From the Huntly Express  January 5 1945

IN AID OF FABRIC FUND OF GLASS PARISH CHURCH

DRAMATIC & MUSICAL EVENING

By Mrs McCutcheon & Party

Weill be held in Glass Parish Hall

On Friday 12th January

Chairman – Rev. J. Campbell, Cairnie

Doors open 7.30: commence 8 pm

Tickets 2s.6d. and 1s.6d.  Children 9d.

DANCE TO FOLLOW

Admission 1s.

From the Huntly Express January 12 1945

GLASS

W.R.I. PARTY – The W.R.I. members and children had a party in the Hall, when gifts from a Christmas tree provided by the president, Mrs Pinsent, were handed to each child by Mr Ewen Pinsent.  Games, including “Pass the Parcel” for which prizes were given by Mrs F. Robertson, organised by Miss Bateson, were enjoyed, to music provided by Mrs James Duncan and Mr Ewen Pinsent.  Tea was served by members of the committee, sandwiches and cakes being provided by members.  Ice-cream, the gift of the president, was served.  A vote of thanks was proposed by Mrs McLean.

Huntly Express February 2 1945

HOME GUARD SHOULD WRITE THEIR ANNALS

To the Editor of the “Huntly Express”

Sir:-

“When the history of this force is written” was a not uncommon phrase used when the Home Guard was ordered to stand down.

My object in writing is to suggest to your Home Guard readers that now is the time when the history of the force should be written, when records are available, memories are fresh and the significance of the great Local Defence Volunteers movement best understood.

I make this suggestion because my late friend and colleague Dr J.M. Bulloch and I searched laboriously in the Record Office for the date that led to the presentation of a fairly good picture of the voluntary rising to arms of the civil population in the North-east to oppose the threatened invasion of these islands by Napoleon.

After much research  the Record Office disclosed its secrets  just over 190 years after the events, but how much easier the task would have been, had the history of Napoleonic  volunteering been written by company or battalion historians at the time that the force was disbanded or merged in the local militia and had that history been housed locally as well as by the War Office.

I mention this personal matter to press my point that the history of every Company of the Home Guard should be written now, with the names of the Guardsmen – and women where they were enrolled – included in the story.

The Territorial Associations will hold the official records, but there are many matters of intimate local interest that ought to be preserved.

Copies of the history, printed or in manuscript should be preserved in some central public place, the local public library where there is one, or in the library of the county town where there is no local library.

Tours etc.

William Will, London

 

Huntly Express 9 February 1945

GLASS WELCOME HOME FUND#GRAND CARNIVAL DANCE

Will be held in

GLASS PARISH HALL

On Friday 16th February

Fancy Dress Optional

Prizes – Best Dressed Couple  10s. each

Best Dressed Lady  10s.

Best Dressed Gent  10s.

Most Original  5s.

Most Comic  5s.

Special Prizes for Children under 14

Commencing 8.30 pm

Parade at 10 pm. Prompt (masks must be worn)

Novelty Dance

J Finlay’s Band

Admission

Gents 2s.6d.  Ladies 2s.  Children 1s.

Refreshments will be sold

J Duff and A. Duncan, Joint Secretaries

From the Huntly Express February 16 1945

ESTATE OF BELDORNEY

PARISH OF GLASS

The following FARMS, presently in the proprietor’s occupation, are to let with entry at Whitsunday 1945 –

1 BACKSIDE AND WRIGHTSTONE, Containing 103 Acres Arable and 67 Acres Rough Grazing.

2 WATERSIDE, containing 48 Acres Arable and 50 Acres Rough Grazing.

The above measurements are not warranted.  The boundaries will be pointed out by Mr W.M. McBain, Beldorney Cottage, Glass, Huntly, on receiving a day’s notice and Conditions of Let may be had from Messrs COCKRAN & MACPHERSON, Advocates, 152 Union Street, Aberdeen, who will receive Offers up to MONDAY 5th March.

ESTATE OF EDINGLASSIE

PARISH OF MORTLACH

To let with entry at Whitsunday 1945, the FARM OF BONFAIL as presently let to Mr Alexander Garrow.  Extent 66 Acres Arable and about 60 Acres Hill Pasture.  The Farm is situated about 8 miles from Huntly.  The present Tenant, who is not an offerer, will point out the boundaries, and Conditions of Let may be had from Messrs COCKRAN & MACPHERSON, Advocates, 152 Union Street, Aberdeen, who will receive Offers up to MONDAY, 5th March.

From Huntly Express February 23 1945

GLASS

CARNIVAL DANCE – A successful carnival dance was held in the Public Hall on Friday in aid of Glass Welcome Home Fund, when the drawings amounted to £111. 16s. 9d.   The fancy dress parade was judged by Mrs Pinsent, Lady Masterton Smith and Mr Robertson.  The following were the prize winners :- Best dressed – Lady, Miss Jean Gordon:  Gentleman – Mr A. McBain:  Best Couple – Messrs A. Morrison and C. Thomson:  Most Original, Mr G. Duncan: Most Comical, Mr J. Wood;   Children;- Best dressed, Doreen Main; Most Original, Tom Garrow;  Most Comic, Ian Smith: Best Couple, Sheila McIrvine and Hazel McIrvine;  Youngest Competitor, Christine Smith; Fox-Trot (elimination) Miss Janet Gauld and Mr George Nicol;  Cinderella dance – Miss Jean Gordon and Mr William Mair.  Music was by J. Finlay’s band, and Mr C. Thomson was M.C.  Messrs J. Duff and A. Duncan were joint secretaries.

Huntly Express February 28 1945

CARNIVAL DANCE

A successful carnival dance was held in the Public Hall on Friday in aid of Glass Welcome Home Fund, when the drawings amounted to £111.16s.9d.   The fancy dress parade was judged by Mrs Pinsent, Lady Masterton Smith and Mr Robertson.  The following were the prize winners:-  Best dressed Lady, Miss Jean Gordon’ gentleman – Mr A. McBain: best couple – Messrs A. Morrison and C. Thomson:  most original Mr G. Duncan: most comical – Mr J. Wood.   Children Best dressed – Doreen Main;  most original Tom Garrow; most comic – Ian Smith: best couple Sheila McIrvine and Hazel McIrvine; youngest competitor – Christine Smith.  Foxtrot (elimination) Miss Jean Gordon and partner; Spot waltz – Miss Jean Gauld and  Mr George Nicol; Cinderella dance – Miss Jean Gordon and Mr William Mair.   Music was by J. Finlay’s band and Mr C. Thomson was M.C.  Messrs J. Duff and A. Duncan were joint secretaries.

Huntly Express March 16 1945

 IN AID OF WELCOME HOME FUND

GRAND DANCE

In the Glass Public Hall

On Friday 23rd March

At eight pm

J Finlay’s Band

Admission – Gents 2s.6d.  Ladies 2s. H>M> Forces 1s.6d.

Refreshments sold

M Duncan and P. Thomson, Joint Secretaries

 

Huntly Express March 16 1945

GLASS

W.R.I. SOCIAL

Mrs Pinsent, president, Edinglassie Lodge, welcomed members and friends at the annual social on Friday and introduced Miss Buchan and party from Huntly.  A programme of singing, dancing, duologues and orchestral selections given by Miss Buchan’s party was much enjoyed.  Dancing followed to music supplied by the local band.  Votes of thanks were proposed by Mrs Watson.

Huntly Express April 6 1945

In Aid of

GLASS YOUTH CLUB

GRAND DANCE

Will be held in

GLASS PARISH HALL

On Friday 13th April

Commencing 8.30 pm

Hay’s Band

Admission  Gents 2/6d.  Ladies 2/-  H.M. Forces 1/6d.

Prize for Lucky Door Ticket and Novelty Dances

Refreshments sold

M.J. and I. Smith, Joint Secys.

 

Huntly Express April 20 1945

In Aid Of

GLASS AND CABRACH NURSING ASSOCIATION

HUNTLY F.P. DRAMATIC CLUB

Presents

“THE WHOLE TOWN’S TALKING”

In glass parish hall

On Thursday 26th April

Doors open 7.30 pm; commence 8 pm

Chairman – Rev. Donald Sinclair, Cabrach

Admission 2/6 and 1/6  Children half-price

DANCE TO FOLLOW

J Finlay’s Band

 

Huntly Express May  4 1945

GLASS

YOUTH CLUB

As the result of a successful dance held recently in aid of Club funds, Miss Jean Smith and Committee were able to hand over the sun of £11.12s.10d.

PLAY

Sponsored by the W.R.I. Huntly F.F. Dramatic Club gave a performance of “The Whole Town’s Talking” in the Parish Hall on Thursday of last week, in aid of Glass and Cabrach District Nursing Association.   The Rev. Donald Sinclair, Cabrach, presided over a large and appreciative audience.  At the close of the performance, Commander Pinsent, Edinglassie Lodge, thanked the chairman and cast.  Mr A.T. Begg, producer, replied.  A very successful dance followed.  The total drawings amounted to £44.13s.

 

From the Huntly Express May 11 1945

 W.R.I. TALK

The local institute had a talk on poultry keeping from Miss Morrison, Insch, who was thanked by the president, Mrs Pinsent.  Competition for best brown and white eggs (judged by Miss Morrison) was won by Mrs Main and Mrs Cruickshank.  Eggs forwarded for competition were gifted to Huntly Jubilee Hospital.  Winners in a word building competition were Miss Gordon and Mrs Pinsent.  Mystery parcel gifted by Mrs W. McBain was won by Mrs Duncan, Westerpark.  Hostess was Mrs Cruickshank, with assistants.  Office-bearers and committee elected were as follows:- President, Mrs Pinsent: vice-president, Mrs Ingleby: secretary, Mrs Watson: treasurer Mrs Cruickshank: press-secretary, Mrs McLean; committee – Mrs McBain, Mrs McPherson, Mrs Robertson, Mrs Main and Mrs Ramsay.

Huntly Express May 18 1945

GLASS

WELL KNOWN FARMER RETIRES

Mr James Duff, who has farmed Boghead for over fifty years and had a small but noted herd of Aberdeen-Angus cattle, retires this month.  The best wishes of the community will go with Mr and Mrs Duff to their new home in Huntly.  Over a long period with his “blacks” Mr Duff at leading shows in the counties of Aberdeen and Banff, won many open and confined championships.  Mr Duff always combined with the practical a very progressive outlook.

GLASS

CHURCH NOMINEE

In connection with the vacancy in Glass Parish Church, the Rev. Theodore Andrew, M.A. Minister of Kineff has been selected as sole nominee.

Huntly Express May 25 1945

In Aid of

THE WELCOME HOME FUND

GRAND DANCE will be held in Glass Public Hall on Friday 1st June at 8.30

J. Finlay’s Band

Ice Cream and Refreshments

Novelty Dances

Admission Gents 2/6d. Ladies 2/- H.M. Forces 1/6d.  Prisoners of War Free

C Thomson secretary

 

Huntly Express 25 May 1945

GLASS PARISH CHURCH

Sunday 27th May

11.30 am – St Andrew’s Church

6pm – South Church

Preacher – Rev T. Andrew M.A.

Huntly Express  August 10 1945

 FLOODING AT GLASS

On Monday, a high wind was blowing from the north and the weather was bitterly cold.  About one o’clock in the afternoon (writes a correspondent), rain began to fall and before four a veritable tempest was raging.  As the evening wore on the fury of the storm increased and the heavy rain of the previous day had sodden the ground to such an extent that flooding was inevitable.

On Tuesday the people awoke to find that the tempest had continued with unabated fury throughout the whole of the night, and conditions underfoot can best be summed up in the well- worn phrase, “water, water everywhere etc.”

The Deveron overflowed the banks at many points and the water reached a level at Wallakirk scarcely every equalled within living memory.  In fact it would be no exaggeration to say that it was much higher than the big floods of forty and fifty years ago,, as it was reaching what was then the high-water mark at points where the river bed has sunk at least three feet.  On all sides damaged growing crop meets the eye, whilst on haugh and turnip and potato drills, cones of hay etc. were swept away.

Between Plylands and the South Church, the road was washed to the very bottom, and to the unheeding would constitute a very grave menace.

It was not until about seven or eight on Tuesday evening that the wind fell and rain gave way to thick fog.  Rain, accompanied by high wind, fell for over thirty hours, so that the storm will undoubtedly rank among the most outstanding of its kind during the century.

It recalls a somewhat similar visitation early in September 1930, and opinions are divided as to which is the greater regarding flooding.  On that occasion an octogenarian who had lived close to the Deveron all his life, declared that only once had he seen as big a flood, namely in 1879.

It may be recalled that terrific flooding took place on the upper reaches of the Deveron about the corresponding date last year due to a cloudburst in the Cabrach.

 

Huntly Express August 24 1945

GLASS W.R.I.

Under the auspices of the above a

FREE GIFT SALE

Will be held in Glass Hall

On Saturday 1st September

In aid of Glass Welcome Home Fund.

To be opened at three p.m.

By MAJOR H.R. SPENCE, O.B.E.  M.P.

Dairy Produce, Cakes, Flowers, Vegetables

Work and White Elephant Stalls

Ices    Teas

Please bring your own sugar

Fortune Tellers   –    Side-shows

Donations towards the Tea, or any of the Stalls, will be gratefully received.

DANCE AT 8.30 pm

Admission 1s.  –  Local Band

Huntly Express August 24 1945

GLASS

HAPPY GATHERING

There was a happy gathering at Glass Hall on Friday evening when Commander and Mrs Pinsent invited the Edinglassie tenants and employees to a dinner to meet Lieutenant and Mrs Andrew Pinsent after their marriage which had taken place in Alexandria in January.  Mr W. Duncan, Mains of Edinglassie, presented the young couple with a clock from the tenants, and Mr J. Mackie, Edinglassie Kennels, a set of twelve silver teaspoons from the employees.  Mr T. Ramsay proposed the health of Commander and Mrs Pinsent.  After an excellent dinner, catered by Mr and Mrs Nicoll, Strathbogie Hotel, the company thoroughly enjoyed an entertainment by Mr Hay Prestowe, Aberdeen.

From the Huntly Express September 7 1945

GLASS W.R.I. SALE

£161 REALISED FOR WELCOME HOME FUND

The sale organised by Glass W.R..I. in aid of the Welcome Home Fund, and held in Glass Parish Hall on Saturday afternoon, was most successful, the handsome total of £161 being realised.  It is expected that this total will be considerably increased as various sums have still to be added.

Mrs Pinsent of Edinglassie presided over the large and representative company and welcomed Major H. R. Spence, O.B.E.  M.P. who opened the sale.

Major Spence said they had chosen a lovely and appropriate day when Japan was about to sign the surrender.  Welcome Home Funds would soon be functioning.   Youngsters would be returning after a lifetime of experiences and they would need practical help and sympathy.  Their outlook would be different, but help and sympathy, he hoped, would ensure that the majority of them would remain in the countryside, where they were needed so much to grow all the food possible.  Agriculture would be, he hoped, a vitally important industry and efforts like this afternoon’s sale would help to prevent a drift to the towns.  He wished all such efforts every success.  (Applause)

Mrs Watson, secretary of the W.R.I. thanked Major Spence, and little Margaret Cruickshank presented him with a gift.

STALLS AND STALL-HOLDERS

Produce – Mrs F. Robertson and Mrs W. McBain

Work – Mrs D. McLean and Mrs J. Young

White Elephant – Mrs Mackie and Mrs Fraser

Flowers and Vegetables – Mrs Watson, Miss Burberry, Miss Gardyne and Miss Robson

Ice-Cream – Miss M. Duncan, Miss Thomson and Mrs A. Smith

Fortune-telling – Mrs Ramsay and Miss Rattray

Teas – Mrs McPherson, Mrs Cruickshank, Mrs Main and assistants.

Amusements – Mr J. Henderson and assistants.

Convenor of sale Mrs Pinsent

A dance followed in the evening, music being supplied by a local band.

From the Huntly Express January 25 1946

GLASS

WHIST DRIVE

In air of the St Valery Appeal Fund, a successful military whist drive and dance was held In the Parish Hall.  Mr Watson, Schoolhouse was the time-keeper and winners were; – 1 Mrs Cruickshank (Capt) Mr Cruickshank Miss Davidson and Mrs D. Gauld.  Consolation – Miss M. Duncan (Capt) Mr A. Duncan, Mr J. Duncan and Mr A. Morrison.  Travelling prizes went to Mr F. Robertson and Mrs Henderson.   The prizes, gifted by Mrs Pinsent, Mrs Ingleby, Mrs Watson and  Mrs Cruickshank, were handed over by Mr Joe Reid, a local ex-prisoner of war.   During the evening bring and buy parcels were sold on behalf of W.R.I. funds.  A well-attended dance followed to music by Messrs Aitken, Duff, Kerr, Ramsay and Reid, with Miss P. Thomson at the piano.  A spot waltz prize was won by Miss M. Robson and Mr P. Thomson.   Mr A. Duncan was M.C. and Mr P. Shand, doorkeeper.  Assistance during the evening was given by Mr Cruickshank and Mr Henderson.  Tea and light refreshments were served by Mrs Ramsay, Mrs McPherson, Mrs W. Gauld and Miss Bateson.

 

From the Huntly Express April 19 1946

GLASS

ST ANDREW’S CHURCH

APPEAL FOR FABRIC FUNDS

This appeal is issued by the Kirk Session of St Andrew’s Church, Glass, with the authority and approval of the Presbytery of Strathbogie.

The Fabrics of the above Church and Manse are in a state of disrepair requiring a large sum of money for the necessary renovations.

The former Heritors of the Church – Sir Thomas Birkett: Mr Ingleby and Commander Pinsent – have generously offered to meet the major cost of the repairs to the Manse.

For the Church renovations, steps are being taken to raise funds from the congregational members, but it is felt that there may be people now outside the Parish who have connections with Glass, and former members who might wish to contribute to the preservations and maintenance of this beautiful Church the “Pride of the Presbytery”

The urgent requirements are the re-building of two of the walls in which dangerous cracks have developed; the installation of a proper heating-system with radiators: the re-setting and strengthening of the Geddes Memorial stained-glass windows; repairs to guttering; the provision of lavatory accommodation at St Andrew’s and South Church; painting inside woodwork  etc.   Major repairs to the Organ will completely absorb a small fund available for this purpose only.    There are further requirements , such as the provision of a lighting system, if the funds can be found.

This Appeal is being made for the sum of £800 and all monies received will be used for the above purposes and for the building up of the Fabric Fund for the furnishings of the Church and to ensure that the Fabric s of Church and Manse will not be allowed to deteriorate.

Those who may feel disposed  to contribute may send their donations to the present Minister, the Rev. D. McNeill Livingstone, c/o The Post Office, Huntly: or to the Hon. Treasurer, Mr Alex. Horne, Boghead, Glass: or to the Gordon Street Branch of the North of Scotland Bank, Huntly: or to the Royal Bank of Scotland, Huntly.  All donations sent in response to this Appeal will be personally acknowledged by the Minister or Hon. Treasurer.

McNeill Livingstone, Minister

Alex. Watson, Session Clerk

St. Andrew’s Church of Scotland

Glass, April 10 1946

From the Huntly Express May 3 1946

GLASS

PLAY

In aid of the funds of Glass Parish Church Women’s Guild the Cabrach Dramatic Society gave a performance of the three act comedy “Crony o’ Mine” in the Hall.  The Rev. Donald Sinclair was producer and the Rev. Neill Livingstone presided and proposed the vote of thanks.  A dance followed.  Mr G. Thomson was M.C.   The total drawings amounted to £46.17s4d.

GUILD

Glass Church Women’s Guild for their last meeting for the season had as guests  the Rev J. and Mrs Campbell, Cairnie.  Mr Campbell gave an address and Mrs Campbell exhibited needlework done by members of Cairnie Junior Guild.  Mrs Pinsent gave a report on the Strathbogie Presbytery Council meeting held at Keith.  Tea was served by members of the Guild Committee.  The Rev. D. McNeill Livingstone and Mrs W. Duncan proposed votes of thanks.  The meeting closed with the benediction.

From the Huntly Express 31 May 1946

MR JAMES DUFF

We regret to announce the death of Mr James Duff, retired farmer, late of Boghead Glass which took place in Huntly Jubilee Hospital on Wednesday.  He was eighty four years of age.

Mr Duff showed skill and enthusiasm in the management of Boghead, a high-lying holding with many disadvantages.  The yield and quality of his crops often attracted attention.

It was a breeder and exhibitor of Aberdeen-Angus cattle, however, that Mr Duff was best known.  From his small and well-bred herd, he secured over a long period many special prizes in the show-yards of Aberdeen and Banff.  He also competed successfully at the “Highland”.

In everything identified with the interests of agriculture in the area, he reflected a warm and progressive outlook.  Farming was not his only interest, and for many years he was the Glass representative on the District Council.  He was a staunch Church man, being an elder of the Parish Church.  He is survived by Mrs Duff and four sons.

 

From the Huntly Express 31 May 1946

GLASS

In AID OF SCHOOL FUNDS

The Cairnie Youth Dramatic Society, gave a successful performance of a “Matrimonial Hairst” by H.J. Duffus, to a large audience in the Parish Hall in aid of the funds of Glass School.  The play was produced by Mr Tocher,  Cairnie Schoolhouse.  Mr Walker, Lower Cabrach School, was Chairman.  A well-attended dance followed to music by Forbes’ Band.  Total drawings amounted to £47 15s.5d.

From the Huntly Express June 7 1946

CHURCH WEDDING

DYCE – THOMSON

With lovely Glass Church as its setting, a pretty wedding took place on Saturday between George, second son of Mr & Mrs Dyce, 27d Old Road, Huntly and Jessie Ann, youngest daughter of  Nr & Mrs Alexander Thomson, Post Office Glass.

The Rev. D. McNeill Livingstone officiated, assisted by the Rev. D.I. Cowan.  The service was choral, with Miss McGregor at the organ.

The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a dress of ivory satin with embroidered net headdress  and long veil, carried a bouquet of roses and lily of the valley.  She was attended by her sister Lillian, who wore a dress of dusky pink and had a bouquet of carnations and lily of the valley.

Master Peter Thomson, nephew of the bride was  train-bearer and Mr Wm Pirie was groomsman.

The reception was held in the Strathbogie  Hotel, Huntly.  The couple left for a motoring honeymoon, the bride wearing a corn-coloured two piece suit, with brown accessories.

 

From the Huntly Express June 14 1946

IN MEMORIAM

Bell – In loving memory of my dear husband Pt. R.M. Bell, K.O.S.B.  killed in action in N.W. Europe 12 June 1944.

Years shall nor darken, nor shadows dim

The beautiful memories I have of him.

Ever Remembered by his wife Alice, Lilac Cottage, Glass.

4 thoughts on “Glass Remembered …. World War 2 (WW2) Newsworthy Events

    1. Glass Community Association Post author

      Thanks Sandy – we’re glad you enjoyed reading the information.

      Reply
  1. Marina Alexander

    Hi Joanna
    Double checked the Huntly Express just in case I had typed the wrong name, but their reporter was at fault I am afraid. The article definitely says Master Peter Thomson, nephew of the bride.
    Glad you are finding items of interest – it is difficult to know which items to include at times.
    Marina

    Reply
  2. joanna thomson

    Just read the heading for Huntly Express June 1946. Dyce – Thomson church wedding.

    What a surprise to find another relative Jessie is my great aunt and through the marriage George is my Great Uncle.

    I thought I’d like to say Jessie didn’t have a nephew called Peter Thomson, but her nephew Robert, so I emailed Jessie and George’s daughter and she has told me my dad Robert was their pageboy and carried the train.

    Reply

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