Glass Remembered …. Another Church Wedding

HUNTLY EXPRESS September 15 1922

INTERESTING WEDDING

A pretty and interesting wedding took place in Glass Parish Church on the 6th inst, the contracting parties being Rev. Philip Douglas Lawrence, M.A. Minister of New Deer and Maud U.F. Church and Miss Elizabeth Paton Gloag Guthrie, youngest daughter of Rev. W.G. Guthrie, the Manse, Glass.  The church, which is one of the most beautiful country churches in the north, was tastefully decorated with pot plants lent for the occasion by Mr and Mrs E. A. Cameron, Blairmore.  The officiating clergymen were the father of the bride and Rev. J. A. Thomson, M.A. East Belmont Street U.F. Church, Aberdeen.  Sir Frederick Bridge, C.V.O., emeritus organist of Westminster Abbey, presided at the organ – his own gift to the church – and as the guests assembled, played a number of his own composition.  At the close of the service he gave a masterly rendering of Mendelsohn’s Wedding March.

The bride, who was given away by her brother, Mr Tom Guthrie, at present on holiday from Canada, wore a dress of ivory crepe-de-chine with over-dress of lace.  Her veil was of tuile with wreath of orange blossom and she carried a bouquet of shell pink sweet peas.  Her only ornament was a sapphire and pearl pendant, the gift of the bridegroom.  There was only one bridesmaid, Miss Nora Forbes, who wore a dress of apricot taffeta with black panne hat to match.   She carried a bouquet of cream sweet peas.   The bridegroom was attended by Mr James E. Pirie, M.A. a fellow student.   After the service a reception was held at the Manse,  when the health of the bride and bridegroom was proposed by Sir Frederick Bridge in a happy and kindly speech.   The wedding luncheon was served in a large marquee erected within the Manse grounds and was in the capable hands of Mr and Mrs James Sandison, Huntly Hotel.  The bride’s travelling  costume was of fawn gabardine with velour hat to match.

Photograph from the Aberdeen Journal of 12 September 1922

wedding

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